10 Sneaky Ways to Get Fit and HealthyŚWithout Really Trying

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By: , SparkPeople Blogger
9/23/2009 7:00 AM   :  223 comments   :  241,719 Views

Faster than a speeding bullet, there's a new approach to healthy living can make you fit as a fiddle. And it's as easy as 1-2-3!

It's called "stealth health" and it's a philosophy that's gaining ground among experts, food manufacturers—and people who want to live a healthier life. Even if you haven't heard of it (I hadn't either), you're probably already using these principles into your life. The concept, as explained in this WebMD article is nothing new to most of us at SparkPeople. It's about taking small actions every day to improve your health, nutrition and fitness levels in BIG ways. We've been advocating a small-steps approach for years, whether in the form of 10-minute workouts or fast break goals. We believe that doing something is always better than doing nothing. And yes, that 10 minutes on the treadmill or that single serving of vegetables DOES make a difference.

When you start small, you feel accomplished. That initial success inspires you to make additional positive changes in your life. So you continue, getting healthier, fitter, and leaner over time—all by starting with a few small changes. Ask some of your SparkFriends, and I'll bet they'll say that this approach has worked for them.

As I read the article and tips about stealth health, I started to think about the ways I sneak a little bit of health into my days. I'm a big believer that small steps—in fitness, nutrition and motivation—really do make a difference, no matter where you are in your lifestyle journey. I use them all the time myself! So I came up with a short list of small things I do to affect my health in a positive way.

10 ways I sneak fitness, nutrition and motivation into my days—and you can, too!

Choose fruit to quell a sweet tooth. I have a big sweet tooth. When it calls, I try to eat a serving of fruit first. Fresh berries and yogurt, an apple with peanut butter or a simple fruit smoothie all pack nutrition and sweetness into a low-calorie package. Most of the time, these fruity treats do the trick, but if not, I'll choose a sweet snack knowing that I have boosted my fruit quota for the day before giving in.

Practice good posture in front of the computer. I try to be aware of my posture at work. I've set up my desk so that my computer screen is higher (to discourage slumping and slouching). I try to keep my back straight and my abs engaged (belly button pulled toward the spine). Good posture, believe it or not, takes a lot of work. Most of us don't have the strength and endurance to maintain proper posture (while standing or sitting) for very long, so it's something that I've been working on developing. If you have trouble sitting with good posture, start small. Set a few reminders on your computer (or a post-it note on your planner) to remind you to think about it and readjust throughout the day. Your posture will improve, your core will be stronger and I bet you'll experience less pain in your neck, shoulders and lower back, too.

Add fruit to pancakes, waffles, ice cream and other desserts. If I'm going to go with a sugary breakfast treat like pancakes, I'll add fruit to them like nobody's business. I pour one serving of blueberries (per person) into the batter. I top the finished product with another 2-3 servings of fresh fruit: bananas, blackberries, strawberries, chopped apples, pears—anything you like. I know that pancakes doused in syrup aren't exactly a healthy breakfast, but by adding some low-cal, filling, antioxidant-powered fruit to the meal, I know I'm getting some good nutrition along with my sugar fix. Same goes with ice cream. I'll try to add one serving of fruit to a serving of ice cream. It "stretches" your dessert further and boosts the nutrition of the final product. Next time you have a hankering for a dessert, look for a fruit-based one. It might not exactly be health food, but it's better than a sugary treat sans the fruit.

Sit on a stability ball. You can make this one small change at home or at work. I sit on a ball chair all day, which helps me sit with better posture and encourages me to keep my abs engaged for better balance and core strength. You can sit on a ball while you watch TV, use the computer at home, or sit at work. If you're going to be sitting, you might as well make it work for you!

Commit to 10 minutes of fitness. I don't care if you've never exercised or if you're a triathlete. Committing to 10 minutes of fitness can help you stick with a solid fitness program—and be successful on the days you really don't want to exercise. This is one of my best tricks to staying fit. This has worked for me for years and it will work for you, too! You can do a lot in 10 minutes (if you don't believe me, try one of my short workout videos). Every minute counts. Even five minutes can help pave the way to a fitter you.

Look at SparkPages and popular blogs. I spend a little bit of time each day perusing SparkPages and reading the popular blog posts on SparkPeople.com. I am amazed at the positivity and success of others, and some of them have great tips and ideas, too! If you ever think that you can't do it, look at some of these success stories to put your problems into perspective. Seeing so many people who have lost 50, 100, even 150 pounds or more makes me feel like my problems are miniscule in comparison and that I can go to the gym or bypass the Boston cream pie in the fridge if they were able to accomplish such great things. This quick motivational trick will help you stay focused. You may even help you meet some new SparkFriends!

Practice portion control. Measuring and consuming smaller portions of your foods is one of the easiest ways to make changes to your diet without feeling deprived. You can enjoy dessert, pasta, and other comfort foods as part of your healthy diet as long as you watch your portions. When it comes to treats, read labels and serve yourself a single portion. At your favorite restaurant, cut down on the calories and fat simply by eating half of the meal and saving the rest for later. If you ate half the size of meals you're accustomed to, you'd be eating half the calories, fat and sodium—a small change that will really add up.

Add more veggies to frozen meals. Of course, cooking meals from scratch is an important thing if you want to eat healthier. But we don't always have the time or energy to do that. I rely on frozen lunches (like Amy's brand) a couple times per week, but I never find them to be very filling or high enough in vegetables for my taste. My standby is frozen broccoli. I'll add at least 2 servings of it to every frozen meal. It boosts the veggie content and it's EASY. If you don't like the taste, try another vegetable you do like—or mix it into your meal to make it go down easier.

Walk through the office. I sit in front of the computer for more than eight hours each day, as I'm sure many of you do, too. Email is a nice timesaver, but I try to get up at least once or twice each hour—whether I'm walking to a co-worker's desk instead of emailing, heading to the café to get another cup of water, or choosing to use the restroom on the other side of the office. It's a chance to stretch my legs and add a few more steps to my otherwise sedentary day. One day I wore a pedometer to discover that one trip to the far-away restroom takes 100 steps. I choose that one over the one in my office, which is only 10 steps from my desk to add a little more activity to my days.

Exercise in front of the TV. Most nights, there's nothing I'd rather do than watch TV. Often, I'll do some simple core exercises, such as Pilates, while I'm watching my favorite shows—or at least during the commercials. Even if I just do three sets of 10 repetitions, it's better than sitting still!


Interestingly, not everyone is a fan of this approach. Associate professor at the NYU School of Medicine, Marc Siegal, MD, told WebMD that the idea of stealth health is, "a small, gimmicky idea to target people with very unhealthy lifestyles," and that these small actions are like "using a Band-aid to stop a hemorrhage." In other words, stealth health isn't a long-term answer for the very people who need to make the most drastic changes to save their health. I can understand how some health conditions are dire and require immediate, sometimes drastic, changes, but I'm not sure I agree. I think that many people are overwhelmed by what it takes to get healthy, lose weight, or start exercising. Overhauling your diet, lifestyle, and exercise routine (or lack thereof) overnight is mind-boggling! This approach sets many people up for failure, causing them to give up before they even try. But starting with small tasks is manageable. Certainly, eating a piece of fresh fruit each day—even if that's the only healthy thing you do—matters, don't you think?

Do you think stealth health really works? What are some of the ways you sneak small bits of health, fitness or good nutrition into your days?


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Comments

  • 223
    Perhaps if you have a serious physical condition, this approach could be discussed more throughly. Otherwise, most people like me, who have to lose pounds but have a good health, will surely benefit from this sensible approach. Big goals, huge changes are overwhelming and, in the end, discouraging! - 8/4/2014   7:02:08 AM
  • IAMENNASUS
    222
    gotta start somewhere and if it starts with steath health, go!
    - 7/19/2014   9:53:20 PM
  • 221
    I think stealth health is a great way to start your healthy lifestyle choices. It seems to me, that it would be a good motivator to see your self make little accomplishments every day.

    I recently started doing a minimum of one 10 minute workout video every morning. Even though I go over my calories daily the last few days, I know that in the last two month of being completely inactive, that ten minutes is a big step for me. Its been encouraging to know that even just a little physical activity is better than none at all. Especially when I use to as a tool for depression. No matter what, exercise makes me feel proud of my self and beautiful in my skin. - 7/19/2014   4:50:45 PM
  • MIDNITERAVEN
    220
    I think that stealth health is definitely a way to get started losing weight because small changes lead to bigger ones. If you start adding fruits to the sweet treats you like to eat you will just end up wanting the fruit. I crave strawberries all the time now because I made them my first choice when I wanted to eat candy. - 6/18/2014   1:01:38 PM
  • SAMUELS15
    219
    Every little bit absolutely matters. This is how I have and am making major changes in my life. I started small with the 10 minutes a day in exercise and am now doing 60ish a day (never thought that would happen). I also started with tracking food and found it made me aware of how many calories I eat so I cut down and started keeping track. It is a building block. - 6/12/2014   11:34:21 AM
  • 218
    Short story: used to be in great shape, have not been for several years, have a pretty good idea of good form and how to work out safely, cannot seem to get any motivation going to get back into a consistent routine.

    And what Coach Michelle has described above seems like the only thing that is working for me (crossing fingers and toes). I've been convincing myself that it's ONLY 10 minutes, just do it and let it go.

    Another thing that I've been using is a free app, "7-min workout." I'll be sitting there on the couch, watching TV and then I think, "just set that baby going and do it!" Having the minutes tick away makes it manageable for me.
    https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/
    7-minute-workout/id650762525?mt=8

    I don't think this is the way to get into the best shape of my life but at this point, any thing that gets me moving at all is so very welcome! - 6/9/2014   2:41:03 PM
  • 217
    I totally agree Coach Nicole. When I was younger, I would make drastic changes, lose the weight, but then not able to keep it off. Now that I'm older and the weight doesn't come off so easily (having prediabetes doesn't help matters), I found that doing too much, too soon set me up for failure. So now I'm doing small changes and getting used to them and then making more. Today it was deciding to have grapes along with our breakfast pizza. My daughter want it to be like a dessert so I got out some whipped topping. The great thing about grapes is they don't grab a lot of that topping so it keeps it overall healthy and Caley and I got a little bit of fruit in our diet. What Dr Siegal doesn't realize is that all or nothing mentality drives people to do nothing. I agree that something IS better than nothing. I love your 10 minute workouts! It's something I can do and be proud of and if I end up doing more that day, great, but if not, at least I can say I did something. I'm also getting up a few times a day at work to move around so I'm breaking up the sedentary part of my job. I believe it helps. I know I will need to do more to get the weight off, but at least for now, I'm doing something that does help. My blood pressure which was in the normal range, but was starting to go up to the borderline normal has now been lowered. I'm hoping eventually these changes will get my blood sugar under control. So I'm at least getting good on the tests with the exception of my prediabetes. - 6/8/2014   11:16:19 AM
  • 216
    small steps lead to bigger steps.Small changes lead to more changes.Eventually they become routine and you are transformed into a healthier person. - 6/6/2014   9:44:12 PM
  • 215
    I would say that most of us tried the radical changes approach and eventually crashed and burned. I can't even name how many times my friends and I have done the change everything, reach a goal, gain it back, plus 10. THAT doesn't seem to work. The stealth approach seems to be working, though it is slower to see the results, it isn't as hard to do and I sense that I won't give up as quickly. - 6/5/2014   6:11:32 PM
  • 214
    I agree with article. Many people feel overwhelmed with all they should do when starting a new lifestyle and breaking it down into little parts may just be the key to success. - 6/4/2014   9:35:34 PM
  • 213
    Great article, and I love these suggestions. I always say any exercise is better than no exercise. I've found that the more good things I do for myself, the more good things I *want* to do. For me, good habits grow and multiply with consistency. - 6/4/2014   11:18:46 AM
  • 212
    Without this approach, I firmly believe I would not be 22 pounds lighter right now. I call it 'baby steps'. Doing one change at a time until you have successfully changed your lifestyle. 5 months into Spark people and those steps have paid off. I disagree that the small steps don't count. I now walk 2-3 miles a day and exercise at least 30 minutes each day. That would not have happened if I had started out trying to achieve this level at the beginning of my WL efforts. The 10 minutes a day really made me feel like I accomplished something every day.

    Slow and steady will win this race. - 6/3/2014   9:08:04 PM
  • 211
    In defense of the doctor, I don't think he's suggesting small changes are useless. These small changes are a place to start. If you're really unhealthy, exercising ten minutes a day for the rest of your life and adding fruit or vegetables to meals is not going to make much of an impact. But, once you've started exercising, your body gets more capable and you find you can exercise for fifteen or twenty minutes, then thirty minutes, and then maybe at some point down the road you're running a 5K. For those folks for whom walking around the block is a struggle, those first few steps have to be small. But they're just a starting point to a healthier, fitter life. - 6/3/2014   5:59:20 PM
  • 210
    I liked this article very much and I think any changes you make to better your health are good and small changes over time can have great results. Thanks for sharing this. - 6/3/2014   2:09:56 PM
  • 209
    to get more in at work i walk to ask questions which sometimes gets me in trouble but it gets me moving instead of sitting all day - 6/3/2014   1:48:37 PM
  • KRIS2775
    208
    My boss always says, "little and often make a lot!" Why can't that apply to health and weight loss as well?? - 6/3/2014   12:01:46 PM
  • AMYJO57
    207
    I know this works. I lost 125 pounds 10 years ago and this is just how I got started, making little changes. I stopped eating a midnight snack and ate one at 11:00 then made that an hour earlier every week or so until I got it to 7:00. I love WebMD but disagree with them on this. BTW, if you don't stick with the healthy changes you will gain that weight back. :-( I quit smoking 5 years ago and have now gained back 85 pounds of that weight and here I go again. - 6/3/2014   11:51:31 AM
  • 206
    I think this so-called 'stealth health' is helpful. Certainly, it gets you to be thinking about things, rather than mindlessly shoveling food or hunting around for the closest parking spot all the time.

    One thing I don't like is critics saying that it doesn't do any good - after all, this is SOMETHING. While it may not be perfect or a lot, one thing that in particular beginning dieters and exercisers do NOT need is yet another person telling them that their efforts aren't good enough.

    Someone who has never walked around the block should be praised for that and otherwise given positive reinforcement, not told that it's not as awesome as a triathlon. - 6/3/2014   11:38:00 AM
  • 205
    I think this does help because sometimes overhauling your entire life is too overwhelming especially when you are already stretched to the max. I implement small changes and they become larger changes. Especially in the exercise arena. If I can just start exercising, then usually 10 minutes into it, I just keep going until I have a good 40 minute workout in. - 6/3/2014   11:13:42 AM
  • 204
    Also, I forgot, one of the recent fitness coach posts was about how to build bone mass. One simple way is to raise yourself out of a chair, off a seating position from the bed, (or even toilet LOL) without using your hands or arms to push off, i.e using only your leg muscles. I've been doing this during the day when I can remember to.
    - 6/3/2014   8:24:15 AM
  • 203
    I enjoyed this article. If you look at the recent "chair yoga" movement, you can easily identify small (sneaky) ways to work in some fitness moves, even while sitting down, for example stretches, leg lifts, ankle rotations, wrist rotations, forward bends. One of my favorite tactics is to park the car at my first errand (post office for example), but walk from there to my next errand (Dollar Store for example). I don't live in a city where people walk! Yesterday I parked at the library, very near the town square but walked across the square to pay my electric bill (but I sat in the City Electric office for a minute or two in the AC before the return trip). I also try to MAKE myself get up during commercials and do something (anything but sit) if I am watching a TV show with commercials, especially a 2 hour movie. During some shows commercial breaks can run 3 minutes or so. - 6/3/2014   8:18:13 AM
  • 202
    This method is the reason for my success. When I joined Sparkpeople it was just for some ideas, I knew I couldn't do anything great fitness-wise, I was too heavy to do much of anything, and my big belly was in the way. I couldn't even see my toes. "Just 10 minutes", is what got me off the couch, and someone recommended Leslie Sansone dvd's since I liked to walk, and that made a difference too. It was something different that I could do, and I received more beneficial exercise, that led to seeing my waistline again along with changing sizes. That along with many of the tips you mentioned above, fast break goals, just 10 min, and finding ways to get more steps helped me get going, and I had the confidence to try different workouts, for a longer period of time. I lost 50 lbs and I've been maintaining it for 4 years now, and I'm still gaining new ideas, workouts, tips, toning ideas, and building endurance, etc. 5 years ago, I couldn't even bend over to plant the garden, now I can do it all and get down in the dirt too, I even climbed a mountain successfully. I still use the tips above and always look for ways to get extra steps or exercises, even if it's just a few minutes here and there throughout the day at work in the restroom, or using a few of your tips at the desk (from the 12 min seated core workout), and stretching. It all adds up, I can see and feel it. I sit all day as well and there isn't anywhere to just get up and walk. I still use the small steps method when embarking on some new type of exercise like Zumba or dance, maybe a new project, or something that may be overwhelming and I may not feel cut out for. It rolls down to other areas of life too, like managing finances, organizing the house, juggling daily tasks, planning and maintaining a workout schedule, etc. If I can do this, anyone can!! I'm very thankful to Sparkpeople for everything on my journey. It's an amazing transformation, inside and out. - 6/3/2014   7:22:23 AM
  • CHARMAINE.C
    201
    Excellent ideas. We also believe that even the smallest efforts will make a difference in the long run. Many small drops can end up raining a storm. - 6/3/2014   3:01:22 AM
  • 200
    i think i'll try some of these ideas - 2/11/2014   5:59:25 PM
  • 199
    This approach worked for me. I started small, then built up from there. Now I've lost the weight, my lifestyle is far more healthy and I've stuck with it for over a year and half now. Great ideas in the this blog - thanks! - 1/25/2014   9:51:42 AM
  • 198
    I already add fruit to ice cream and yogurt. Adding it to pancakes and broccoli to frozen meals is a good idea. - 9/7/2013   3:04:18 PM
  • 197
    small steps works for me. i'd love to have a stability ball at work,,,,,,, but, i'd probably get hurt! better to save that one for home. =) - 7/11/2013   10:53:35 AM
  • 196
    Some great, "sneaky" ideas here! Never thought to work on my posture and core while sitting in front of the computer! Thank you-- I'm strengthening my abs as I type this! :-))) - 7/10/2013   10:42:08 AM
  • 195
    A great article--this is the way to build habits, then enlarge them. I found the posture reminders particularly apropos, as well as the pedometer. I ordered mine! - 6/15/2013   8:33:20 AM
  • 194
    Thanks - 6/9/2013   10:54:14 PM
  • 193
    What are people like you Evie? So youre already doing things mentioned in the article. Add more steps. I've been dieting (& losing) for over a year, and can always add 10 more minutes past exhaustion or etc. I love the concept, and believe it works for the majority. - 5/26/2013   3:38:24 AM
  • 192
    Baby steps are a great way to start a long journey. We all know this is a process not just a few "events" like losing 10, 50, or 100 pounds. The journey doesn't end because we hit a magic number, the scenery changes a bit (more clothing choices, more activity options, yee hah!).

    As a few members pointed out, baby steps aren't going to result in large weight loss but they sure help lay a foundation for more robust steps and for future maintenance. Something beats nothing and forward momentum can always speed up (2 minutes dancing today can help you do 3 minutes tomorrow, 10 minutes next week, and 45 minutes next month). Persistence and patience are key to the self-discipline that enables you to metamorphosize into what you want. - 4/14/2013   9:25:36 AM
  • 191
    great info for all of us! Thanks! - 3/14/2013   8:00:26 PM
  • 190
    I love this article! I didn't get in my unhealthy situation over night. It took a long time. I realize I won't get back in shape, in a healthy way, over night. I have begun taking these small habits -- making them into streaks -- (thank you, Spark Guy) until I'm ready to add another habit to my lifestyle. First streak...at least 10 flights of stairs a day. Second streak...at least 20 minutes of cardio a day. My Third streak will be at least 30 minutes of strength training. I will be adding several of these fantastic tips to my daily living. Thanks! - 3/12/2013   11:35:41 PM
  • JULIA1154
    189
    With all due respect, I think Dr. Siegal is all wet in his approach. It is well known that successfully accomplishing small tasks leads to greater likelihood of meeting larger goals - this is simple human psychology. It is very empowering for people to feel that they are doing something for their health and usually leads to additional steps in that direction. There's an old saying that "the perfect is the enemy of the good" and I think it applies here! - 2/27/2013   5:43:42 PM
  • 188
    Some if these suggestions are so simple. I'm going to try a few myself.
    Last month I started parking 1/2 block on the other side of the parking lot from the entrance to my office. I have already seen an increase in my average daily steps.

    I have always used 1/2 oats to 1/2 pancake mix in my batter. Plus I add a whole purred banana and the whole family is getting these nutrients without really noticing the difference. - 6/18/2012   1:56:54 PM
  • 187
    As I was reading SparkPeople this morning, I came across this older blog entry by Coach Nicole. It was just what I needed to read at the beginning of the new year as I prepare for some fairly lofty fitness and professional goals this year. The additional ideas in the comment section from PKLOSH were right on as well. Here's to a stealthily healthy 2011 for all! - 1/2/2011   11:48:34 AM
  • PICKELJUICY
    186
    Thanks, those are some really great ideas. Even though I might have already known about some of them before this article has motivated me to start incorporating them into my lifestyle because they are so easy to do. - 11/20/2009   9:51:47 PM
  • 185
    This summer at a playdate, I picked up a hula hoop and tried to hula. It took me quite a few tries, but I managed to keep it up for a minute or so. It was actually a fun workout...it gave me a great idea! I bought one for myself!
    I leave it behind a chair in my living room and now when I'm watching one of my shows, I'll pull it out and hula hoop the show away. I've gotten pretty good at it now and can keep it going for a good 10-15 mins straight. Sometimes that's the only exercise I get that day, but at least it's something!! Try it and don't give up, you can do it with some practice!! - 11/5/2009   8:53:15 PM
  • PKLOSH
    184
    Here are the stealth tactics that really DO work, from someone who has used them to good effect:

    1. Add fiber to your diet: Apples, pears, brewer's yeast, flax meal, and so on. Among other things, the fiber absorbs a few calories and passes them through your system. Also, with high-fiber diets, portion control is much less of an issue (high fiber foods often have volume but few calories)
    2. Drink 4+ cups of green tea or white tea daily -- the catechins help metabolize belly fat
    3. Make a pedometer your primary piece of fitness equipment, so that you have a baseline of activity and a daily target. Unless you've sharply restricted your calories, it's hard to lose weight on fewer than 12,000 steps a day
    4. Supplement major workouts with minor exercise sessions throughout the day: Walks, crunches, etc.
    5. Walk in place: No need for equipment here, you can do this in front of the TV without inconvenience or noise
    6. Prepare your own meals: Skip the processed crap and the high-calorie restaurant meals, and weight loss may be simpler than you think
    7. Add unprocessed, unflavored cocoa and sprouts to smoothies. The cocoa contains powerful antioxidants and fiber, and most sprouts are high in protein, vitamin C, and fiber - 10/16/2009   8:43:31 PM
  • CHARMAINEK1
    183
    oh yes this is how it should be done . start off one step at a time untill you have done the complete transformation , you will be 100% fit ,healthy and in better shape - 10/15/2009   10:28:29 AM
  • 182
    This Dr. Siegal is the definition of what is wrong with so many doctors today. He is completely out of touch with the reality that is faced by so many people who are overweight and out of shape. He, I'm sure, would rather just have his patients have gastric bypass and be done with it, then he doesn't have to do the work involved with coaching them (or finding someone to coach them) through the lifestyle changes that will permanently alter and improve their lives. I am disgusted with the attitude of so many medical professionals that say "you'll never be able to do this on your own." And there are many out there.

    On the flip side, I LOVE this article. It approaches the journey to health with baby steps, and anyone who has ever read anything I've ever written on SP knows I am a huge believer in baby steps. Because baby steps lead to giant leaps. Once you get rolling, the sky is the limit. It's not a diet, it's a way of sustaing yourself for the rest of your life. You aren't going to exercise until you lose the weight, you are going to exercise and be active for the rest of your life. Thank you SP for showing so many of us the way, and giving us a place to learn, vent, celebrate and succeed. - 10/13/2009   2:03:46 PM
  • 181
    Great article. I think I will keep it as one of my favorites also. I'm glad that people have advised that it really works. It's great motivation. - 10/7/2009   9:56:29 PM
  • 180
    I really liked this article. Thanks! - 10/7/2009   11:17:18 AM
  • JAMSIS48
    179
    am a BIG FAN of this approach I have planned and started the great exercise plan to lose 80 pounds for so long and everytime i start something comes up.
    so i do it in small steps, i make healthier choices in the foods i eat eg. adding fruits to cereal wholegrain of course, choosing flavored water or water over juice, Green Tea instead of coffee (no sugar) if i need a little a sweet to it i add honey. walk more.
    I still want to do the big thing you know exercise 30-60 minutes a day eat mostly veg and like a bird but its a lot to fit in esp. with work and family. - 10/6/2009   1:34:40 PM
  • 178
    Great ideas, I drink at least 1 glass of water in the morning as soon as I get up. This leaves only 7 to go! - 10/4/2009   10:46:35 PM
  • 177
    I've gotten results when I remember to do these things. One of my favorites is the old trick of parking far away from the store, school etc and walking in. Its amazing how that little bit adds up. - 10/4/2009   1:21:13 PM
  • 176
    Here's a sneaky way to get more green leafy veggies. Next time you make a delicious smoothie, slip a couple of spinach leaves (frozen is best) in with all the fruit. You need a good machine (like a Vitamix), but you won't see or taste the spinach. Use the same method to blend some green veggies into sauces, expecially tomato sauce. This is great for finicky kids, including the adult kind. YUM. - 10/3/2009   9:26:41 PM
  • 175
    something is always better than nothing. It doesn't have to be black & white. I'm gonna go drink a glass of water right now and eat a juicy, Fugi apple :D.
    Thanks for a good article! - 10/3/2009   1:02:12 AM
  • CINCIN65
    174
    I think everyone should read these hints. There's something for everyone here. Thanks. - 10/2/2009   5:26:31 PM

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