Is the Junk-Food 'Addiction' Study Junk Science?

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By: , SparkPeople Blogger
10/23/2013 6:00 AM   :  67 comments   :  18,943 Views

"I'm fat because of Oreo cookies!" screamed the woman as she entered the weight-loss class I was coaching last week. In hand, she waved the press release from Connecticut College, which blared the warning, "Oreos are just as addictive as drugs!" 
 
 
"I am addicted to certain foods, just like those rats were addicted to Oreo cookies," she continued on.  "It's supposed to be worse than being addicted to cocaine. How am I ever going to be successful with my weight loss?"
 
 
While I had seen the study hit several of my RSS feeds earlier in the day, I really had not given it much attention. Other research has already shown that sugar-filled, fat-laden foods trigger the area of the brain that brings about pleasurable feelings. This pleasure center of the brain is also stimulated by drugs such as cocaine, morphine and alcohol.  In fact, studies using an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machine have shown the activation of this pleasure center when certain foods are consumed. 
 
To me, this popular news story was touting the same message as published in the New York Times article earlier this year, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food."
 
But when you combine the words "Oreo," "addiction" and "drugs" in a headline, you are bound to grab the attention of the reader, and this study did just that. In the Connecticut study, rats were placed in a maze that had two routes to different treats: sugary Oreo cookies or bland rice cakes. After the rats became familiar with the maze, you can probably guess which route they preferred---the path to the Oreos. The treats at the end of the two routes where then changed to a shot of saline (salt water) or a shot of cocaine or morphine. I imagine you can guess which injection the rats went for.  According to the researchers, the rats in the experiment spent as much time hanging around the Oreo zone in the food test as they did the cocaine zone in the drug test. This led the researchers to assume there was a similar level of addiction. 
 
But that isn't exactly a correct assumption. To show the degree of addiction one would need to know how hard the rat is willing to work for the reward, such as how many times a rat would be willing to push a lever to get the reward. Honestly, this study only supports previous studies that have shown that sugary and fatty foods like Oreos produce pleasure or are more enticing than non-sugary, non-fatty foods.
 
This particular study doesn't really prove that Oreos are "addictive," as eye-catching headlines would like you to believe. Whether any food can truly be "addictive" is still unproven. Certain foods and certain drugs do seem to share parallels in brain response.  There have been studies where rats were fed a "junk-filled" diet and then put on a healthy diet.  The brain changes were similar to those seen in drug addicts when trying to kick the habit.  And just as an addict develops tolerance and needs more to feel satisfied, so do overeaters who binge.
 
As a Registered Dietitian, I keep wondering what the best takeaway message from this study (and its aftermath) really is. How can we maintain control in an environment where these pleasure-stimulating foods are available with such ease (and excess)? How can we use this information to help prevent our children from becoming overweight? How does this help with our weight loss (or weight maintenance) efforts?  I came up with these six strategies, and ask for you to share your success-building ideas as well.
  1. Out of Sight, Out of Mouth: Clean out your kitchen, pantry, car, and work area first. Get rid of the junk and the temptation. Check out this plan to break your sugar "addiction" (and remember it will work for other foods, too). 
     
  2. Raise Your Voice: Ask for healthier options in your company's cafeteria, vending area, and break rooms. Request that nutrition information be available so you can make informed food decisions.
     
  3. Give Praise and Patronage: When national restaurants and private diners offer healthier options, substitutions, and the nutrition information; tell them how much you appreciate their movement towards better health. Vote with your fork (and wallet) to show your support for healthier fare.
     
  4. Kids First: Don't forget to support your child's school cafeteria as they try to bring about healthier options. 
     
  5. Arm Yourself: It is a dangerous food environment in which we live. Practice strategies (plan meals, pack snacks, read labels etc.) to stay full and satisfied so that you are less tempted to pull through the drive-thru window, grab a snack at the gas station, or overeat at the vending machine. 
     
  6. Single-Serve It: When you do want some Oreos, fish crackers, or ice cream, make a plan and purchase just a small single-serving portion—not the entire bag or box. This will allow you to make only one trip through the "maze" to get to the Oreos, rather than 25 pleasure-seeking trips those lab rats got.
More on this topic: Coach Dean blogged back in 2011 about the idea of food addiction and whether "addiction" is the right word to use to describe our pull toward certain foods. Read his take here.
 
What do you think? Are Oreos (or any other foods) as "addictive" as drugs?


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Comments

  • FOXGLOVE999
    67
    The fact that we needed a study to tell us that people do things that feel good, is bizarre. Really, isn't this common sense. Overdoing things that feel good is not the fault of the thing, but rather a reflection of our own issues. - 8/29/2014   10:09:39 PM
  • 66
    I found the biggest difference between D&A addiction and food addiction is that to defeat the former, the addict must be prepared to give everything she has to slay the dragon; in the latter, the addict must put the dragon in a leash and take him for a walk, everyday for the rest of her life. - 5/23/2014   10:56:53 AM
  • MRSPERLY1
    65
    My daughter is in graduate school. She wrote a research paper on food addiction for her one of her classes. Her paper was based on scholarly articles and reading some of the actual research studies. To keep balance she read scholarly articles questioning and criticizing the research as well. So far, there are studies that continue to validate the findings that hedonistic food substances (salt, sugar, & fat) impact the brain like drugs and alcohol do. Mental health and medical research professionals mostly debate not if, but why there is a correlation and how to respond to the findings. One thing everyone seemed to agree upon was that more studies are needed. She said the American Psychological Association has not classified food as an addiction. Yet.
    What does this mean to us?
    Her opinion. If you think you have binge eating disorder or if you are concerned about food addiction go and see a mental health counselor or psychologist that specializes in eating disorders. - 4/12/2014   10:39:16 AM
  • 64
    If you want to read an informative book on the notion that foods can be addictive, find a copy of one of the following books

    The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable North American Appetite by Kessler Md, David A. (May 4 2010)

    Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Moss, Michael (Feb 26 2013)

    There is lots of entries on the Sparks site regarding these books.
    After having read the first book, I couldn't tell if I was more angry at the 'food giants' for concocting the perfect formula to make the consumer 'desire' their product or if I was angry at all us consumers that support those same food giants. VERY good read. VERY informative.

    Borrow them from the library. - 3/18/2014   10:19:57 PM
  • 63
    We don't expect recovering alcoholics and recovering drug addicts to put up their hands and proclaim "I am addicted to X" and give up. Rather through counselling, support groups, and sheer determination of mind, we expect them to battle their addiction, overcome and become a functioning part of society.

    The articles alluded to in this report about the similarities between addictive drugs and the addictive quality of certain foods (salt, sugar, fat) can be informative and lead us to demand changes in the food industries, but the final result is this. The food, addictive or not, does not make me fat. How much I ALLOW to pass over my teeth into my stomach is what makes me fat.

    I can understand the addictive qualities of certain foods, but unless the cookies (or whatever) are forcing themselves into my mouth the blame falls squarely on the me. - 3/18/2014   8:30:37 PM
  • 62
    Everybody is different. I have a huge addiction to sugar. It's pretty scary actually. My family is really confused by it due to them not being this way. I have a sweet tooth but it goes past that.

    When I think of a treat (cookies, etc.) my mind won't release that thought. My mouth waters, I can smell it, taste it, and become agitated until I get it. I have a horrible time breaking myself of it. I have to cold turkey for 2 1/2 weeks (including no fast food) before I can walk by it in my house. I don't keep sweets in my house because I can't stop eating it. It litteraly takes over all my thoughts. It sounds stupid, but it's true. I'll try for months to break the cycle and it's the hardest thing I ever do. I will it in my mind and get the shakes when I don't have it. I go through an emotional rollarcoaster while I'm litterly detoxing from the sugar.

    I'm a completely different person after 2 1/2 weeks. I can make it on one cookie (not the entire box) I don't feel the NEED to HAVE to have them anymore. I do know that I can't have more than a couple of sweets a week or it triggers it all over again.

    Mentally its horrible and a true addiction. You don't understand it if you don't have it. It can be broken but you have to get over that hurdle and then stay away from it. - 11/28/2013   11:21:53 PM
  • 61
    I believe sugar and other unhealthy foods are not as addictive as drugs. They give us a rush and we like the way it feels. It vaies from person to person. Like drugs, some people love uppers, Other perfer downers and there are those that dont get a psychological rush from it. So, with our unique bodies, we crave differently. I crave sugar then desire salty to counteract what I just ate. - 10/31/2013   10:37:16 AM
  • JUSTDOIT-DEB
    60
    While I understand why KARLEIGH66 says what she does, corn is also a major staple and can be eaten healthfully. A corn tortilla is fairly healthy, often only containing ground corn and lime juice, just don't eat a whole package. If we could stop supporting the junk food producers by buying their products, believe me, those companies would quickly invest in making whatever everyone was eating! Also, I was a little surprised to read that she thinks they 're cheap, as I don't consider $3.00 per package and up (for Oreos, which this article is mostly about), low cost. One can buy a celery bunch for under a dollar, or radishes, green onions... well you get the picture. I lived off of $25-$40 a week for food in the late '90's and was even able to buy whole salmon, Chinese pea pods, fresh mushrooms and other 'expensive' foods. You can choose to eat healthy, those who blame the expense and buy the addicting and unhealthy food are often fooling themselves. I am not saying KARLEIGH66 is one of those people, just that you can eat fairly healthy on a smaller budget if you shop smart. - 10/29/2013   11:46:33 PM
  • 59
    I am truly allergic to Oreo Cookies. I get terrible headaches if I eat too many, so I usually pass them up.




    - 10/29/2013   11:14:38 PM
  • 58
    I definitely think that you can be addicted to certain foods. These foods are often comfort foods for those who emotionally eat. Other times it is food that we eat out of habit. When we try to stray from eating this unhealthy food on a regular basis we get to having withdrawals and we crave the "feeling" that these foods bring to us. It can be very hard to break a food addiction, and honestly that is why most of us are on this site because we are addicted to food and we can't get enough of it. - 10/29/2013   10:56:08 PM
  • 57
    I do understand that the more sugar you consume, the more you may crave it. However, this is a lot different than having an addiction to something. - 10/29/2013   2:14:15 PM
  • 56
    Great advice from Becky Hand, take control of your lives! And yes, I VERY much appreciate when restaurants decide on their own free will to offer healthy options.

    Finally, to say that Oreos are as addictive as cocaine is beyond insulting and totally belittles the true problem of drug addiction. - 10/29/2013   1:49:45 PM
  • 55
    And so the food police tries any way it can to control the population. OREOS are EVIL, AUUGGGGHHH! Good riddance, what a pathetic assumption. How about this, take responsibility and control of your own lives. - 10/29/2013   1:44:07 PM
  • 54
    I concur, CMORGAN253.
    Thanks JANEDOE, student of addiction/animal model. I will check that out. - 10/29/2013   11:34:00 AM
  • GLENDASUE66
    53
    . Rice cakes? Oreos? Duh! Maybe the rats just had good taste! - 10/29/2013   11:26:56 AM
  • 52
    Good advice! I do believe sugar is addictive, due to what it does to the pleasure center of the brain and the fact that once I get started I have a hard time stopping. But that doesn't mean I stop trying to fight against it. - 10/29/2013   8:32:15 AM
  • 51
    Yes, rule No. 1: do not keep any temptations around the house!

    Whenever I think I crave something rich, I make a whole recipe of it in my mind. I go through the whole process: mixing, cooking, I can even smell it mentally! If it's a cake, I even ice it and then I imagine eating some.

    I'm a chef so there's hardly anything I don't know how to make! If I got desperate I guess I could cook a whole buffet of stuff, but usually one slice is enough!

    This is one of the techniques I used on the way to my goal, and it still works now that I'm there. - 10/29/2013   6:52:01 AM
  • DELLMEL
    50
    I agree with CAREN BLUEJEAN - 10/25/2013   7:01:23 PM
  • 49
    Remember the Twinky theory??? Sugar kills in more ways than one. - 10/25/2013   3:41:18 PM
  • TINA8605
    48
    It took me a month to clean out my kitchen before I started my diet. I have always believed in the out of site, out of mind. I don't have cravings when I don't have it in my kitchen. If I do have something that I should not really be indulging in at this time, I place it in the back of the cabinet. This way, its not the first thing I see. I have found things I forgot about. When I did find it, it was way out of date. I would still try to eat it but found it was too stale or not tasty to eat. As to being addictive? I, too, had a drug habit 17 yrs ago. I find food as addictive as the drugs I took. It takes a great deal of will power to just say no. I put the same practice to food as I did the drugs...wait 5 minutes, wait 5 more minutes. Usually the craving is goes away. I find getting busy outside of the area helps as well. Again, out of site, out of mind. - 10/24/2013   9:23:37 PM
  • 47
    Yes I do believe certain foods are addictive..I have used the analogy of my addiction to sugar and carbs similar to a friend that is a smoker. He has no clue what it is like to be addicted to food, or the need for carbs for comfort, but he could surely relate to the need for a cigarette..It IS the same sort of thing and as any addiction with self control and mind control and faith within yourself and maybe some outside help the addiction can be controlled and the habit broken. Anyone who says it is not an addiction, obviously is not an addict, as any other drug if you haven't been there, you don't understand! - 10/24/2013   6:41:49 PM
  • 46
    No, I don't believe that it's an actual "addiction". If I believed that, I would probably give up trying to lose weight right now! I believe that it's a learned behaviour. I've taught myself to prefer those sweet and/or salty snacks, and with a lot of work, I'm now teaching myself to prefer healthy foods most of the time. I've been on and off diets for 40 years, and SP has taught me more in 2 1/2 years than I learned in the previous 37 1/2. No one says it's going to be easy, and it isn't always fun, but if you stick with the program, track your foods, choose healthy meals and snacks, exercise, and learn to balance your carbs, fats and protein properly, you will lose weight. If you stop tracking, you will probably start to regain the weight.
    Gail - 10/24/2013   11:07:00 AM
  • 45
    To me it is an addiction. One bite of a sugary sweet leads to another which leads to Eating junk food and nothing but junk. I 'm like a coke head or crackhead but my addition is sweets. - 10/24/2013   10:43:17 AM
  • 44
    To me some foods are mentally/psychologically addictive, but not physically addictive. Some drugs are physically addictive and have withdrawl symptoms, etc., cookies or whatever junk food you find addictive, isn't like that. But junk food can be somewhat addicting. For me this is salty treats like combos, Doritos, etc. I hate the fact that I have to measure out my 1 oz. serving, while my husband and son who are very thin by nature, can eat straight out of the bag. I know that I will never be able to eat straight out of the bag unless it is a personal size bag, which I refuse to pay that much more for per oz. As one of the chip companies say... you can't eat just one and for me that is true. Some reason french fries though, I can steal one or two from my family and feel just fine. Chips are a bit harder to do that for me. - 10/24/2013   6:57:57 AM
  • 43
    I can say, I have personally had to battle oreos. I don't know about the cocaine thing, but I do believe it stimulating the same part of the brain. - 10/24/2013   5:31:20 AM
  • 42
    I don't buy that any kind of food is as addictive as cocaine and/or morphine. Battling our appetites is tough, but anyone who has seen an alcoholic or drug addict detoxing couldn't possibly think that these two different types of addiction are even remotely the same thing. Shame on the media for promoting this kind of misinformation. I know it is difficult to kick a sugar habit, but kicking a drug habit can be positively hellish, sometimes even dangerous. Get real! Just say "NO" to the cookies! - 10/24/2013   2:34:25 AM
  • 41
    Sugar hits the same receptors opiates do. Just like addicts of "drugs" people also crave more and more sugar once they eat it. And people will eat sugar until they succumb to dire consequences. // www.lurj.org/article.php/vol1n1/sug
    ar.xml

    - 10/23/2013   11:15:20 PM
  • CMORGAN253
    40
    I think if the scientists wanted to prove an equal-level addiction, perhaps they should have put the rats into a maze with Oreos AND Cocaine/Morphine and Saline. If the rats are then hanging around the Oreos as much as the drugs, then maybe we could draw a clearer conclusion. All this study managed to prove is that rats like Oreos more than rice cakes and they like Cocaine more than saline. Not exactly ground-shaking. - 10/23/2013   11:00:03 PM
  • 39
    Studies have conclusively shown that chocolate stimulates the release of endorphins, which are the morphine-like substance in the body. So, for some people, Chocolate can be addictive. But that is SOME people. Not everyone prescribed Lortabs for pain becomes addicted to them. Only those not willing to look at themselves and honestly evaluate their own choices and actions will grab onto these studies and apply them to themselves. - 10/23/2013   9:37:38 PM
  • 38
    Junk food of any sort does me in every time. Once I see it I got to have it! It is a struggle for me daily! - 10/23/2013   7:43:58 PM
  • RILEYSGBOX
    37
    To funny I never did like Oreo Cookies not even as a kid, not a big junk food eater either my weekness and my doing in.. Soda.. I can say no to the burgers and fris easy but staying off the Soda is my battle none this week trying to stay strong... ok time to get my mind on something else ....lol - 10/23/2013   7:39:46 PM
  • 36
    I think that it's all in the mind. My mother was a chain smoker for over 20 years and was able to quit cold turkey. There are people who have been on drugs or alcohol and was able to be clean the first time around. I used to eat a lot of sweets like kit-kats and Hershey bars. What stopped me from eating it is a decaying tooth that had to get pulled. Deep down, I don't think that food is addictive. It's all about what emotions you have towards food. - 10/23/2013   7:10:49 PM
  • PREACHERLADY565
    35
    Do love junk food...but not at all into sweets. Give me chips and salsa or nuts over chocolate any day. EXCEPT, I got braces a few months ago.....no chips * no nuts.....ah well...at least my smile will be straight - 10/23/2013   6:55:12 PM
  • 34
    Oh, I know I have a junk food addiction. . As soon as I let myself have a piece of cake or candy or a ( a manufactured goody or fast food meal) it seems I can't get enough! I want more and more! No amount satisfies the craving! My thinking even changes. I start justifying the choice. I tell myself oh its just a "slip up" I'm allowed. Oh just a little bit more then I will stop. All the things an addict says when using drugs! - 10/23/2013   5:38:04 PM
  • 33
    If you'd like to find out whether sugar (Oreo's, after all, are made out with sweet stuff, mostly high fructose corn syrup) is addictive, try a 28-day sugar detox. If a substance is not addictive you can just stop, right? Sugar detox is painful and you get really bad cravings. - 10/23/2013   4:20:20 PM
  • 32
    I think to a certain extent there are addictive foods. Fast food being a major one, there are things added to the food to bring you back again and again. I personally ate at Taco Bell a minimum of three to four times a week. Is the food there really that great? I don't think so, I think it has everything to do with all of the sodium and other flavor enhancers that is put in that food to have people like me come back over and over and frequently.

    I think if Taco Bell served just healthy foods sith a minimum of sodium they would not be doing the huge business that they do. The same can be said for all the other fast food chains. And the serving sizes are out of proportion to what a normal person would eat. Although in recent years the sizes have been coming down. No longer is there the Super Size option... - 10/23/2013   4:17:19 PM
  • FLOYDIE40
    31
    When I was in highschool (late 70s - early 80s) there was an article that said sugar was so addictive that it took a a full 6 months to totally withdraw from it.

    You can wait for a definitive study if you wish, or you can be the science. Go off it for 6 months and track your emotions and reactions carefully. I know it's addictive for me.

    I can almost always walk away from oreos, but is there a huge point in determining if your kid is addicted to sucking his thumb, or just breaking the habit? - 10/23/2013   4:15:46 PM
  • FLOYDIE40
    30
    When I was in highschool (late 70s - early 80s) there was an article that said sugar was so addictive that it took a a full 6 months to totally withdraw from it.

    You can wait for a definitive study if you wish, or you can be the science. Go off it for 6 months and track your emotions and reactions carefully. I know it's addictive for me.

    I can almost always walk away from oreos, but is there a huge point in determining if your kid is addicted to sucking his thumb, or just breaking the habit? - 10/23/2013   4:15:41 PM
  • BETTYCOOPER121
    29
    I also think that some of the foods are really addictive. Like i just cannot resist eating salted potato chips. No matter how hard i try i keep on eating them. - 10/23/2013   3:47:11 PM
  • 28
    I may be way out in the left 40 acres here, but I have two thoughts about the oreos and cocaine connection that is all over the airwaves.

    1. I've heard that the brain developes responses to Triggers that make you think about Oreos or sugar cubes or whatever. Argument with the kids? Have a bag of chips, if that was what you did after the last argument. Just missed your monthly commission on the job? Have a smoke break - that always makes you feel better.

    2. Concerning cleaning the house, work desk and stable of junk foods - Remember the experiment with the children who could resist the marshmallow or the sugar cube for five minutes for a reward? One of the articles I heard went on to say that people (adults) who resisted junk food at the store (and therfore didn't have it in the house) were more successful in their weight control.

    3. So, I'm more interested in the triggers (that jerk makes me want to do something with my hands! Chips and salsa! Great Idea!) and what can be done to deal with those triggers (Write him up in my journal!. exclamation points !!!.)
    Doing "something else" for five or ten minutes is a strategy I have seen recommended on SP, and I endorse it. And the other strategies listed in the article to decks of unhealthy eating opportunities. We don't have to be passive receptors of what's being thrown at us.

    Okay, that was three things, and thanks for listening. - 10/23/2013   2:08:19 PM
  • 27
    From an evolutionary point of view it makes sense. When we, or any animal, eats high calorie food, the brain and taste buds are there to reward us and encourage us to continue to eat this food as much as possible as its good for our survival. In nature those who don't starve pass on their traits, and those who didn't starve are the ones who ate calorie rich food.

    In today's world though we have (in the first world) an almost unending supply of most any food, especially cheaper high calorie food. What used to be a favorable survival trait is now an unfavorable trait that could lead to obesity and other problems. - 10/23/2013   1:05:04 PM
  • 26
    Personally, I do not believe in food "addiction", I do believe in: MMMMmmmm...that's is soooo freakin' good, I want more! (the implication here being: So, I will blame the food rather than my lack for self-control/good decision making) Hey, no blame, I have done this myself....just giving my thoughts on the subject as invited to.... :) I will, however, stipulate that caffeine is addictive...headaches abound when tapering off...I used to smoke...with God's help quit cold turkey once, when found out was pregnant quit cold turkey, and twice have used Chantix because wanted to quit and couldn't seem to utilize the self-discipline button! Three years free...plan on the rest of my life....as for caffeine-I purposely keep it to a minimum, get more sleep, eat MUCH healthier, and exercise more to keep up the much needed energy levels and overall positive outlook on myself and life. - 10/23/2013   12:33:25 PM
  • 25
    I never have to worry about Oreos. They taste good, but leave me with an upset stomach. So, years ago, I just left 'em alone. - 10/23/2013   12:04:07 PM
  • 24
    I have been clean and sober for 28 years, and abstinent from most of my addictive food behaviors for 3 years. The reason junk food is "more" addictive, I think, is that it is available everywhere and considered acceptable. When we teach our kids that eating a whole bag of Oreos is as unacceptable to us as smoking a cigarette or a joint (by not keeping any of these things in our house!) we will begin to change this trend. - 10/23/2013   11:57:52 AM
  • 23
    I have found that I crave what I eat. I weigh the satisfaction of that treat vs the feeling of craving more that I KNOW will kick in once that treat is gone. I still allow myself to have desserts/treats, but I make sure to portion them out and track them to make sure I'm within my SP range. I also savor each taste instead of being distracted and then wanting more because I didn't really take the time to enjoy it. But the biggest aspect for me is taking a pause to THINK about why I am wanting something chocolatey or sugary. If it is because I am stressed/lonely/tired or another emotion, then I use diversions and other tools to let that moment pass. Sometimes it's worth it to have the treat, but most times not....especially if it's cheap junk. For example, I'd rather have 1 expensive piece of chocolate than the candy you can buy in any store.

    Now that I've been eating better for a solid 4 months, I've noticed a change in what is appetizing. The times I have opted to eat out at a fast food joint...well, it became evident pretty quickly that it wasn't the wisest choice and is now a VERY good reminder the next time that craving comes up! You CAN break the habit... with every next choice you make!! : ) - 10/23/2013   11:48:45 AM
  • 22
    I know I am a food addict. I think about food constantly. To keep on track, I plan out my meals. I do not buy "junk food". I do eat out once a week. I plan on what I eat and where I am going to eat. This has helped me a lot. - 10/23/2013   10:15:07 AM
  • TIME2BLOOM4ME
    21
    It's the MSG, artificial flavors that create addictions. It is proven in studies. - 10/23/2013   9:50:39 AM
  • 20
    I have had trouble with oreo's and peanut butter m and m's, they have been addictive to me. - 10/23/2013   9:46:29 AM
  • 19
    Great strategies!!! - 10/23/2013   9:13:08 AM
  • 18
    Spelling error:

    Out of Sight, Out of Mouth: Clean out your kitchen, pantry, car, and work area first. Get rid of the junk and the temptation. Check out this plan to break your sugar "addition" (and remember it will work for other foods, too).

    the word in quote should be "addiction" - 10/23/2013   9:06:10 AM

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