Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

 
Message Boards
FORUM:   Recipes & Cooking General Discussion
TOPIC:  

Homemade Yogurt?



Click here to go to SparkRecipes.com.

 
 
Search the
Message Boards:
Search
      Share
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Author: Message: Sort First Post on Top


DPDAVIS
SparkPoints: (95,347)
Fitness Minutes: (28,754)
Posts: 2,609
9/22/12 6:03 A

Sounds delicious



PJANTO
Posts: 79
9/19/12 8:30 A

I make a gallon of yogurt at a time using 1% milk. 2% milk yields even thicker yogurt, but I strain mine anyway so it gets pretty thick, even cream cheese thick if it sits long enough.

I heat the milk to 180 degrees on the stove. Much quicker than waiting for the crock pot to do it. After it cools to 120 degrees, I add 3 oz of yoplait greek yogurt and stir well. This step will cool the milk down a bit.

I then transfer the milk to a gallon glass jar that I place inside a large stockpot that has been filled part way with very hot water, and then place that in my oven that has been warmed to about 150 degrees and turned off. If you cover the whole thing with a thick towel, it can sit undisturbed for up to 15 hours. I've read that the gradual reduction in temperature allows the different strains of cultures to incubate better rather than a constant temperature. Some prefer warmer while others cooler.

I then cool the yogurt in the jar overnight in the refrigerator and save some unstrained for smoothies, and strain the rest in a colander lined with paper towels for up to a day. I prefer splenda for sweetening, which I add right before eating. It's all about trial and error, this is what's easiest for me. It's very rare for a batch to go bad, and it's usually from overheating the milk in the beginning, as this can kill the natural yeasts in the milk that you want to keep.

Regarding vanilla, add right before eating...drops at a time to taste. If you flavor an entire batch, it could cause it to become pretty thin. When strained, I find that I like it better just slightly sweetened.

Edited by: PJANTO at: 9/19/2012 (08:34)


KERRY4614
Posts: 646
7/14/12 11:19 P

I did not think of the corningware dish that is a great idea! You know I set it for 11 hours in the morning it is turned off. Sometimes for flavoring I use sugar free jam and also put part of vanilla bean in the milk mixture and I use the milk powder added to give it more protein too.
The first couple of times I thought it was time consuming too.



NANCYHOME247
SparkPoints: (25,074)
Fitness Minutes: (18,637)
Posts: 550
7/14/12 8:17 P

My new Euro Cuisine yogurt maker arrived yesterday, so this morning I bought a half gallon of 2% milk, and tried it out! I used a recipe from a yogurt/cheese making book from the library, which gave a whole lot more information than the tiny pamphlet that came with the unit. Here's what happened:

I made half a recipe, using 4 cups of 2% milk, 1/3 cup of powdered milk, and 1/4 cup of Fage 2% Greek Yogurt. My digital meat thermometer accurately told me when the milk was hot enough to take off the stove, and then again when it was cool enough to add the starter yogurt.

Instead of using the little jars, I poured the 4 cups of liquid into a Corningware bowl that fit nicely inside the yogurt maker. The cups would have held 42 oz of liquid, but I wanted to strain the entire batch for Greek yogurt, so the bowl was a better choice. Turned it on and set the timer for 7 hours.

The timer did beep... 5 times VERY quietly... and the unit turned off. Had I not been in the kitchen at the time, I would have missed the tone completely, so it's a good thing the unit shuts off automatically. The contents still seemed a little thin, so I turned it back on for 2 hours more. Then I spooned the thickened yogurt into a fabric-lined strainer and left it to drain for 1 hour.

I ended up with about 1 1/2 cups of thick Greek-style yogurt. It's pleasant-tasting enough, but it doesn't taste quite as sumptuous as the Fage.

So, I feel a little deflated this evening. Moneywise, I spent $1.25 for 4 cups of milk to make 12 oz of plain yogurt--that's definitely a cost savings on the raw material. But it sure seems like a long drawn-out process for 2 6-ounce servings of yogurt.



MIRV22
SparkPoints: (15,683)
Fitness Minutes: (9,144)
Posts: 622
7/11/12 7:33 P

Thank you to both of you for your responses. I might attempt a small batch in the crockpot, but I have a feeling that the yogurt maker is the preferred way to go for me. My sister's is just one quart and there are several reasonably priced 2 quart makers. I might check out the one you mentioned. I love this discussion, thank you!



NANCYHOME247
SparkPoints: (25,074)
Fitness Minutes: (18,637)
Posts: 550
7/11/12 5:56 P

KERRY4614:

I, for one, offer my appreciation for your comments. Too bad about the instruction booklet included with the gadget, but I'm not that surprised. By they time they get done printing it in 3 languages, how much space do they have to do a good job, anyhow!

I thought I'd try using a refrigerated active yogurt culture to begin with. That failing, I'll look into buying a yogurt starter. And yes, I could NEVER go back to the time before general Internet searches! Seems I look up something or other more times a day than I've got fingers. Google will probably provide more information and tips than I'll know what to do with.

You're the second person who's mentioned the Yogurt Bible. I'll have to check to see if my branch library has it first before I go spending more money on something I may or may not use.

Thanks for taking the time to send your information.



KERRY4614
Posts: 646
7/11/12 5:40 P

I purchased the Euro Cuisine yogurt maker and do not use it as often as I thought I would mostly because of fatigue but I purchased an extra set of the little jars so when these were not finished I could make more and one set of yogurt starter which I am glad I did. I found the little book that came with not very helpful. I found a lot of information on eHow about yogurt that was very helpful and I also purchased the Yogurt Bible from Amazon which is a wonderful book besides so many great hints for the yogurt is has a Whole Foods Section, healthy living and healthy body systems which goes through all our systems such as circulatory, respiratory etc.

That is probably more than you wanted to know but I hope someone reads it!



NANCYHOME247
SparkPoints: (25,074)
Fitness Minutes: (18,637)
Posts: 550
7/11/12 4:20 P

MRV22: My new Euro Cuisine Yogurt Maker is coming tomorrow!! (I confirmed with Fedex today!). One of the consumer reviews for this yogurt maker was that you can place a large bowl inside it instead of having to use individual cups.

There's plenty online about making yogurt in a crockpot, and I've pasted a sample below. Seems like there's a lot of work involved in checking temperatures, waiting, checking temps again, waiting... kind of labor intensive to remember all that checking. And then what if you goof? Do you end up with a quart of wasted milk and several hours of wasted time? Had I not already ordered the actual yogurt maker, I probably would have tried the crockpot method first, just to see. After reading the process, even though it means another appliance to store, the yogurt maker gets my vote.

STEPS TO MAKE YOGURT IN A CROCKPOT (found online--I did not test this!):

Pour the milk into the clean crock pot. The amount can range from a quart to a gallon, but the process is the same, so let your family’s batch size determine the amount of milk. (Want to make yogurt in the wilderness? Click here!)

Turn the heat to high and using a good kitchen thermometer, carefully watch the milk until the temperature reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Plan on an hour, maybe two hours to reach this temperature. Don’t let it get hotter and boil. Once you know how long your crock pot takes to heat up cold milk to 180 degrees you can make a note of it.

Don’t skip the ‘heat up to 180 degrees’ part – this sterilizes the process by killing undesired bacteria that may be waiting to be cultured along with the good, desirable yogurt cultures.

At 180 degrees, turn the crock pot off and let it sit until the temperature reaches 115 degrees. A good kitchen thermometer is critical for making yogurt. 110-120 degrees is good for adding the culture; 115 degrees is perfect. You can estimate the cool-down period at around 2 hours. Here again, check it often. You want to hit the 110-120 degree window.

Cooled down milk may have a skim across the top – if it does, remove it. It’ll be too tough (don’t worry if you forget though – it’s just milk protein) to be included in the final yogurt.

When the temperature is right, add approximately 1/4 cup of active cultured yogurt to the mix. Stir gently but do mix it very well so the yogurt culture is well mixed into the warm milk.

Now for the tricky part: You have to keep this yogurt batch’s temperature stable for the next 7 to 12 hours.

Option 1: Keep the yogurt in the crock pot warm by covering it with a thick cloth, a blanket or towel, turning on the thermometer to low for just a few minutes every 3 hours or so. Keep the crock pot in the off position except for about 10 to 15 minutes every 3 hours. This process should take about 7 to 8 hours to finish. Again, watch your first batch carefully, then you’ll know how to regulate future batches.

Option 2: Keep the crock pot lid on and place the yogurt and crock pot container inside your oven. Turn on the oven’s light but no heat. This process takes about 12 hours minimum to culture and sometimes can take up to 24 hours.

Option 3: Place the crock pot and yogurt into an insulated cooler, place thick towel or blanket around to insulate it. Check the temperature about 3 hours into the culturing and, if necessary to keep the temperature between 110 and 120. plug in the crock pot, put it on low for about 10 minutes. Unplug and recover. In 3 more hours, check again.

The process of keeping the culturing process temperature stable is not flawless and involves some work but these 3 options seem to offer the best methods to culture large batches with minimum work. When the yogurt making is complete and you have the desired thick yogurt, spoon it out into containers you can refrigerate, or keep it in one big tub for scooping out like I do.




MIRV22
SparkPoints: (15,683)
Fitness Minutes: (9,144)
Posts: 622
7/11/12 4:07 P

I just borrowed my sisters yogurt maker and loveit, but I think I want to make bigger batches, as I will likely strain the yogurt. Im terrified to use my crockpot, but I suppose I should try.



NANCYHOME247
SparkPoints: (25,074)
Fitness Minutes: (18,637)
Posts: 550
7/2/12 5:36 P

Thanks, Kerry:

It's good to know folks like you pay attention to old Message Boards!

I read your comment about your Yogurt Bible. I remember using a wedding gift-yogurt maker back in the 70's--as I recall, the yogurt was kind of bitter. So I'm eager for the latest-and-greatest version to arrive and I can begin experimenting.

I tasted Fage 2% Plain Greek Yogurt for the first time a couple weeks ago: my yogurt "bar" is now set very, very high.





KERRY4614
Posts: 646
7/2/12 5:20 P

There are many websites and information on homemade yogurt and the library has many books you can take out to see what you like.
I bought the yogurt maker and use it regularly it is very handy so this way once you get the hang of it you can experiment with the other ways.



NANCYHOME247
SparkPoints: (25,074)
Fitness Minutes: (18,637)
Posts: 550
7/2/12 4:17 P

Well, bummer for me. This morning I ordered a yogurt maker online, since it seems I'll be eating a lot of it in the future. Should have checked here first, or I first would have tried letting my crockpot do double duty. I do like the automatic shut-off feature on this product I ordered, though.

Anyhow, that's water under the bridge. It's on the way.

Thanks for the flavoring suggestions, as well as the starter tips. When my appliance arrives in a few days, I'll need more advice on how to make the Greek yogurt. I've got a cupboard shelf of various McCormick extracts, and I'll give those a try for flavoring: the banana extract sounds good.



KOFFEEGIRL1
Posts: 37
12/23/11 6:33 P

I bought the electric yogurt maker and don't use it anymore. I now use the stovetop method and a heating pad! Yes, a heating pad! The yogurt comes out wonderful and making/clean up is a breeze! I saved glass jars from spaghetti sauce, salsa, all different sized. I like the bigger sized jars.

http://homemade-yogurt.blogspot.com/2009
/05/making-yogurt-with-heating-pad.html



KERRY4614
Posts: 646
12/14/11 7:50 A

Great ideas! emoticon



KENTUCKYMARY
Posts: 18
12/14/11 7:38 A

I have a yogurt maker that has individual cups. after I warm my milk, I add a little of this milk to my starter to thin out the starter and then add that back to the rest of the milk. I stir it well to make sure the starter is evenly distributed. Then I pour it into individual cups and incubate. Before I bought a yogurt maker, I used a number of methods to incubate. You can use a crock pot with water (turned to low). Also, I've warmed the oven, turned it off and put the yogurt in there too. I have oven termometer I can put in the oven and periodically reheat the oven to boost the temp.

I like to make plain yogurt in individual conainers because it is already pre-measured. It is easier to take in a lunch too. Also, I add any fruit or honey or sweetners to each container, so I'm not stuck with a whole batch tasting the same. Also, you can save one container as starter for the next batch.

After a number of batches, you will need to buy another yogurt to get fresh starter. I take out 2 TB for starter and freeze the rest of the starter to use when I need a fresh starter. Just thaw and scoop out as needed.

Love homemade yogurt.

One other note, someone mentioned straining the yogurt through a coffee filter put in a colander. Works well for Greek yougurt. You can also add gelatin to thicken the yogurt. Pour one package of Knox gelatin over 1/4 cup tepid water and dissolve. Add to the milk along with the starter. Stir well. It makes it thicker, more like store bought yogurt.

Hope this helps.



DIMPLES807
Posts: 215
12/13/11 10:13 A

I love making my own yogurt! I typically use honey as a sweetener and that would add in after the incubation time. I also strain it since it's nice and creamy. I would use the vanilla bean idea for flavoring.



KERRY4614
Posts: 646
12/11/11 10:38 P

I was doing yogurt search and came upon this topic. I took some books out of the library and the BEST was the Yogurt Bible . They have lots of tips for making yogurt , many recipes for making it and using it and there is a separate sections for each of your bodies systems such cardio, digestive , respiratory and whole foods. There was so much info that i bought it. But I am glad that I took them out of the library because it was the only book that stuck a lot of post-its in.
I use stevia for sweetener and their vanilla bean recipe calls for real maple syrup but I bought sugar- free pancake syrup and put a teaspoon in when use it.

Edited by: KERRY4614 at: 12/11/2011 (22:39)


BADCHULO
SparkPoints: (16,526)
Fitness Minutes: (17,355)
Posts: 368
6/2/11 11:49 P

Ah...good luck (with the yogurt and all your wedding plans!) ! Just wanted to add...if yountry the bean... that the whole vanilla bean is what I use for a gallon of milk....so if your batch is smaller you might wanna use less bean....



JENNGETTINGBUFF
SparkPoints: (15,987)
Fitness Minutes: (9,145)
Posts: 668
6/2/11 11:11 P

Thank you so much for the advice! I am going to do it in the crockpot since I had plans to buy a new one this weekend anyway. I think I'll leave out the Splenda and just add it to the smoothies as I go, since I always end up adding a packet to them anyway. Wish me luck.



BADCHULO
SparkPoints: (16,526)
Fitness Minutes: (17,355)
Posts: 368
5/31/11 7:09 P

Not sure what method you use to make your yogurt (I do mine in the crockpot) but I have found that using vanilla extract sometimes gives me a thinner yogurt ( think it might be the alcohol in the extract). What I have tried and liked is to get a whole vanilla bean... I scrape the seeds into the milk while it is warming (if you like a strong vanilla flavor than you can also put the seed pod in while it warms).
Not sure about the Splenda as I haven't tried that... I wonder if you could just gently stir a bit into the serving you are going to eat...or into your smoothie as it blends... (if you haven't tried homemade yogurt yet just know ahead of time that is will be quite a bit thinner than what you buy in the stores due to lack for gelatin or artificial thickeners they use...and stirring it to hard will make it even thinner as it kind of "breaks down"). I usually end up straining some of mine (in a strainer with a couple of coffee filters spread over it .. I like it thicker like Greek Yogurt...but for smoothies it would probably be just fine without straining !!). In fact, when I strain my yogurt for eating...I save the liquid that comes off and use that as the liquid in some recipes and in my smoothies. Homemade yogurt is well worth the effort !!



JENNGETTINGBUFF
SparkPoints: (15,987)
Fitness Minutes: (9,145)
Posts: 668
5/29/11 5:31 P

Hello everyone!
I just read the directions for making homemade yogurt, and I'm really interested in trying it! However, the only recipes I've found for flavoring it have been with fruit. I'd really like to make it vanilla-flavored, since I usually buy store-bought vanilla yogurt as an ingredient in smoothies for breakfast. Anyone know a good ratio of vanilla to yogurt? Also, I've seen people have pretty good results sweetening with Splenda. What are your suggestions for my first time attempting this?



 
Page: 1 of (1)  
Search  



Share


 
Diet Resources: complex tachycardia | reentry tachycardia | toothpaste with fluoride
x Lose 10 Pounds by November 1! Get a FREE Personalized Plan