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ANNEV2012 SparkPoints: (13,528)
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6/10/12 9:18 P

How hard are you working out? If you're an Olympic level athlete you might take a day off or have an easy day, if you're a regular exerciser you might do the same, but if you're working out 30-60 minutes a day at low to moderate level, there's really no need to take a day off.

EMMANYC Posts: 1,702
6/10/12 8:26 P

I take a couple of days off per week. I usually work out 2 or 3 days in a row, then take a rest day. On my rest day, I might still go for an easy walk (e.g., 15-30 minutes), but that's it.

MENHALLS SparkPoints: (31,347)
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6/10/12 6:47 P

For me, one day off, and i mean off, no cross training, very light housework, no shopping per month is a great idea. I do a chill out day and find my workouts are so much better. The idea is to do this mid-week, otherwise it turns into a cheat day all day! I am much more disciplined in my eating on weekdays compared to weekends.



BOR9455 Posts: 52
6/10/12 2:39 P

As others have stated within this thread, I think it is all about the exercises you are doing and listening to your body.

For example, I have been to the gym or conducted a workout everyday since April 26. Some of you may stop and say, whoa there big fella, and the over training alarm bells are going off all over the place.

I lift my lower body (squats, lunges et. al) on Mondays and Thursdays, giving those groups of muscles a hefty 72 or so hours of rest before I challenge them like that. My schedule allows for only upper body to be worked on Tuesday and Saturdays. I do a little light cardio each day for about 15 minutes to get my HR up and to work up a lather, but nothing challenging. However, that leaves Wednesday, Friday and Sunday as cardio days to focus solely on that and get a good workout there. To add to that, my Friday workout, because it is Friday can sometimes be light, or kind of BLAH! I have to find workarounds in my Friday schedule, because my wife typically works in the evening, which means I'm home alone dad that evening without the childcare at my gym. The past two Fridays, I have gotten up early and gone to the gym and did 30 mins of intervals (that was a little rough) and the week before I ran 3 miles in the morning before work. They were a challenge, got my HR up, but they were active rest and recovery in my mind. The biggest thing you can see from my schedule is that I do give my muscle groups time to recover between their biggest challenges. On the weekends, in addition to some heavy cardio, I also tend to do a lot of walking, as that is our time to run errands as a family (grocery shopping, big box store shopping, going to the park with my son, or going for walks as a family). While that walking isn't making a huge difference in my fitness, would you believe that 8 months ago I dreaded going shopping because I got super tired, my feet always were in pain and just generally made me miserable because of all that extra goo I was carrying? Well now it is a night and day difference.

I have had some pretty tough weeks, but I do listen to my body. I track my workouts in a notebook, and I notice trends of how many reps I was able to knock out, and when I start noticing a trend of tougher and tougher (about every 10 weeks or so) I look to back it off for a week, do some resting recovery and focus on stretching, hydration and solid eating. I think it helps some people to take days where they don't do any exercise, that isn't me, but I do certainly take it easy on myself, especially during my recovery weeks, where my time at the gym condenses down into about 40 minutes instead of 1.5 hours I'm there on an average week.

JENEFURPIE SparkPoints: (689)
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6/10/12 1:29 P

Thanks! You put into words what I couldn't quite describe. I worked out six days so far, and today, I tried my normal workout, which is high intensity aerobics - TurboJam, 40 minutes, and it was like I felt so heavy. I didn't understand it, and that's why I asked the question. I still feel very energetic, I cleaned the house to get that extra energy out and that was a workout in itself. Deep cleaning anyone?! And I plan on going for a walk after dinner tonight when it's cooler out.

I just wanted to check if it was normal because it felt so weird to NOT be able to do my normal exercise.

SP_COACH_DEAN SparkPoints: (92,716)
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6/10/12 1:09 P

Whether you "need" a day off every week will depend on your inividual needs and also on what kind of exercise you do and how intense it is. Most people don't need a day off from walking, for example, but it can be a good idea to take periodic days off from high intensity training, running, etc. And if a "mental health" day off helps with maintaining your motivation and commitment, that's fine too. It might also work just to mix things up--high intensity some days, easy exercise other days.

Your body will usually let you know if you're overtraining--it will get harder to perform at your usual level, and you may start having mood and/or general fatigue problems. At the other extreme, taking a day off (or even a week off) will not cause any decline in your current fitness level or performance, so you don't need to be worried about that. So, there really isn't any single policy about a weekly day off that should apply to everyone-you can let your body be your guide.

Hope this helps.

Coach Dean

SILVASHAN Posts: 167
6/10/12 12:29 P

I struggle with this too. Im so concerned about not losing momentum that I worry about not exercising one day a week. Im working on it though.

JADOMB SparkPoints: (98,964)
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6/10/12 12:22 P

Odd that you were unable to find this topic, it's talked about quite frequently. Maybe there just wasn't a thread dedicated to it. But most all studies show we need rest periods for most all forms of cardio and ST. Sometimes when it is varied and lower intensity it's not as important or needed. Such as jogging one day then walking the next. Of even if you are just doing a light low intensity jogging it may not be so important. Many runners that train every day do it in ways that still allows them to recover, but even they take rest periods as they feel the need.

In ST, if one is doing the lighter weights that don't tax their muscles that much, they could probably do it every day without any real issues. But if you are working out properly and working to fatigue, your muscles should get a day of rest to repair themselves.

DRAGONCHILDE SparkPoints: (57,014)
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6/10/12 11:49 A

Absolutely you should take a day of rest! Even pro athletes have days off. Rest days are when your body gets stronger! REst is even more critical than the actual exercise.

When you don't take rest days, you begin to overtrain, and break your body down. I've actually been kinda doing this myself lately. While I do take days off, I wasn't taking enough... and an accidental two week light workout (only once or twice to the gym each week) saw me suddenly drop a couple of pounds. ;)

Remember to take care of your body. Rest doesn't have to mean inactivity; it's fine to do something light like a walk or yoga if you're feeling up to it, but you need to listen to your body. Sometimes... sitting on your bum is a good thing.


JENEFURPIE SparkPoints: (689)
Fitness Minutes: (1,180)
Posts: 3
6/10/12 11:34 A

Hi! I tried searching for this topic, but nothing came up. Please let me know if there are other posts about this.

I work out every day, but I've heard that sometimes it's good to take one day off per week to let your body heal. Is there truth to this? Do I need to worry about this or should I just keep going and work out every day?

Any advice is appreciated! Thanks!

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