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Rendering tallow

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

So I got some free suet (beef fat) from the farmer I bought some organic, grass-fed beef from. This evening I rendered it - cooked the fat out of it - and made tallow with it. Tallow is like lard, only beef instead of pork. I'll use it for cooking, like I use lard. Or like I would use butter. It has very little flavor and has a high smoking point, so it can be used for frying. I got a little over a pint of tallow from a pound and a half of suet.

Here's a link to the process I used. www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-rende
r-beef-tallow/#axzz2M8cVyT7i


I started with suet that was still about half frozen, so it was nice and firm. I cut out all the bits of meat and such I found, and then cut it into about 1/2" pieces. I put the cut up suet in a cast iron Dutch oven and put it in a preheated 250 degree oven. I left it for about 45 minutes, and stirred it. And stirred it again after about 30 minutes and then again after about another 30 minutes. Took it out of the oven and scooped off the "cracklings" or browned pieces of fat. Then I poured it very carefully through a fine meshed tea strainer. I put the cracklings back in the Dutch oven and smashed them down well with a pastry thingy. (You know, one of those round things you use to cut the butter into the flour to make pie crust.) and then back in the oven for another 15 minutes or so. Then took it out again, scooped the cracklings into the tea strainer and pushed through all the fat I could. I put the cracklings on a paper towel in a bowl to drain some more, then salted them and ate them. They weren't nearly as good as pork cracklings. Or nearly as good as the fat on a steak or something like that. Don't know why, but they weren't.

Tallow is a lot harder than lard. It sets up hard at room temperature, at least at room temperature in my house. I'll keep some of it in the fridge and keep some of it out on the counter so it's soft enough that I can scoop some out.

And remember - it was free!

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

NAYPOOIE 2/28/2013 1:56PM

    Free is good. Good fat is good.

I should maybe take over Mom's kitchen. I do almost all of my cooking there these days, while her cooking these days consists of toasting bagels. I need space for my storage containers, so they're handy when I batch cook.

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Tuesday, February 26

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Breakfast - MIM, tea with splenda and gelatin
Lunch - Broccoli and Cheddar Quiche
Supper - meatloaf, Roasted Cinnamon Delicata
Snack - tea with splenda and cream

Total cost of food eaten - $4.02

I splurged at school last night and had tea with cream and splenda. I take my own tea bags (I drink decaf tea and few places have it) so they only charge me for the cup (39 cents with tax) even though I use their Splenda and cream. It makes me a bit uncomfortable, getting the cream and splenda without paying for it, but that's the way they price it.

  


Monday, February 25

Monday, February 25, 2013

The Food Stamp Challenge is over, but I thought I'd continue to post my menus, at least for now. I'm sort of curious to see how much my "normal" food costs.

Breakfast - turkey broth (from the carcass from last night), eggs, gelatin
Lunch - I gnawed the bones that had been cooking all night in the crockpot for broth and still had quite a bit of meat left on them, and had some romaine with herb vinaigrette
Supper - meatloaf, Cinnamon Roasted Delicata
Evening tea - tea with splenda and gelatin

total cost of food eaten today - $3.40

  


Cinnamon Roasted Delicata

Monday, February 25, 2013

Delicata squash is lower carb winter squash. The ones I have seen at the Farmers Market are about a pound each. They are sweet, cook more quickly than other winter squash, have a thinner peel that cuts easily, and the peel is eaten, too. Which makes it much easier to use than most winter squash. One pound of squash has 158 calories and about 33 net carbs.

Tonight I cut a squash in half legnthwise and scooped out the seeds (which of course I'm saving to bake and eat like pumpkin seeds). Then I cut it up into about 1" pieces, tossed them in 2 tablespoons of melted lard (coconut oil or butter would work, too), and then tossed with 1 tablespoon of cinnamon. Baked it at 400 for about 20 minutes or until soft. It was very good, with all the sweetness coming from the squash itself. I ate half of it tonight, which is more carbs than I usually have from a veggie, but that was about all the carbs for the day.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

EXOTEC 2/26/2013 12:46AM

    Delicata is hands-down my very favorite squash! Seems like you can only get it for a limited window of time, unfortunately. That may be best though, since if we're eating seasonally correct foods, and that's the right time for Delicata...well...

I also do the cinnamon thing. I don't cube it up, though; I just slice it in half lengthwise, put a goodly portion of butter in the scooped-out cavity, and sprinkle it with Splenda blend and cinnamon. I bake mine under foil with a little water in the pan for about 30 minutes and then take the foil off and finish cooking til it's tender. I can make a whole meal out of half a Delicata! I've also used pie spice, which is tasty on any winter squash.

Yum. Now I've got to go on a safari for Delicata! I wonder...maybe I could cube it up like you do and freeze the cubes. Or mash the baked meat and freeze that? I just want it out of season, glutton that I am! LOL

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LIVERIGHTNOW 2/25/2013 8:00PM

    that sounds yummy. Haven't seen Delicata since I moved up here. There is a Farmer's Market about 45 minutes away...might try there but not sure they are open this time of year. Tuesday is their day, maybe I'll go for a drive tomorrow. Thanks MAW

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Meatloaf

Monday, February 25, 2013

Here's a recipe for meatloaf. It's not real cheap, but it's reasonably priced. And good. And low carb. And easy.

BEST MEAT LOAF
(adapted from Low Carb Comfort Food Cookbook)

2/3 c heavy cream
1-1/2 lb lean ground beef
1 T dried parsley
1/2 c finely minced onion
1 t salt, or to taste
Pepper to taste
1 oz Parmesan cheese
1 egg

Preheat oven to 325.

Combine all ingredients, mixing lightly. Do not overmix. Put in oaf pan. Bake for about 1 hour or until done.

Total cost, using ground chuck at $2.77 per lb = $5.36, or $1.34 per serving for 4 servings.


  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

NANCYPAT1 2/25/2013 7:50PM

    Thank you for posting the recipe - it sounds delicious

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