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Reference Guide to Exercise Intensity

An In-Depth Look at Heart Rate, RPE and the Talk Test

30 Comments



  • NJMSTAR
    I think the the standard formula for determining MHR is very inaccurate for many people. I bought a heart rate monitor thinking I must not be working hard enough because I never saw improvement in my fitness level. According to the formula I should be in defib at rates over 160, but I found that I was frequently in the low to mid 160's and felt fine. When I slow down to the 75 to 80% range it feels like nothing more than a casual stroll. Although I am in better shape than many my age (60), I would hardly be considered an athlete, just a slightly overweight housewife. - 4/11/2015 10:05:09 AM
  • "And what if you are walking 17 mph but it is all hills (up and down)"

    That's some pretty fast walking!!!

    My doctor told me to forget the calculations and heart monitor devices and let your body tell you (as long as you are pushing yourself).

    and basically, you know when you are pushing yourself when " you can answer a question, but not comfortably carry on a conversation."

    the most important thing here is I got my doctor's advice. - 2/24/2015 4:44:27 PM
  • "Using this method, the goal is to work at a level where you can answer a question, but not comfortably carry on a conversation."
    This should be printed on little laminated cards and affixed to every piece of exercise equipment at the gym, for the benefit of the chatty fatty workout buddies.
    Quit your yapping and get to work!! - 2/24/2015 8:54:15 AM
  • very informative and things I needed to know before I over do my exercises. - 2/7/2015 12:17:13 PM
  • Although I have read this article previously, there were many things I had forgotten. A great deal of useful information. - 7/7/2013 3:06:52 PM
  • I enjoyed this article so much and a lot tof the information I did not know. Thank you - 5/28/2013 8:07:53 AM
  • This article is very useful to me as I am on Beta blockers and I have actually been using the Perceived rate of exertion without knowing. I have come to know when I have to back off, usuallt if I start wheezing or whatever. Very useful article. Thank you. Oh, and I still have been able to improve my cardio capacity using this method! - 12/29/2012 1:49:01 PM
  • KANDIKAKE
    This article was very helpful - 11/8/2012 2:28:09 PM
  • Great article. I learned something new again. - 10/28/2012 5:13:58 PM
  • DOINITRIGHT2012
    great article. - 9/1/2012 5:07:19 PM
  • Great article. Thanks! - 7/27/2012 12:55:49 PM
  • HPSANDDOLLAR
    I learned something. - 6/10/2012 9:22:48 AM
  • And what if you are walking 17 mph but it is all hills (up and down) -- and fairly steep ones at that? I guess I have to use the perceived exertion scale. I am just not going to be doing any calculations on my heart rate. - 5/13/2012 6:12:12 PM
  • Frankly I find the math of all of this very hard to take there has to be an easier way. I do have a heart rate monitor but every time i wear it i react to it. No matter how much I clean it. I am reluctant to buy another one because it will likely happen aagain. Pat in Maine.
    I love most of the articles I read but the complcations using metric and standard just confuse the old head. - 4/30/2012 7:55:28 AM
  • sorry, correction:
    (60%-80%)
    for the first method 96-128
    for second: 118-139

    That's still a difference of 11-12 BPM, which is a big difference! - 4/25/2012 3:13:25 PM

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