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Eating to Prevent Osteoporosis

Early, Continuous Prevention is Key

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  • A diet high in animal protein has been proven to leech the body of needed calcium from the bone. Calcium from plant sorces is great and weight bearing exercises strengthen the bones. Also....get out in the sun for much needed Vit. D. :o)
  • I want to add to what MBSTRINITY said regarding a dairy-rich diet. I feel that we have all been "seduced" by the diary industry to believe that 3 glasses of milk a day will keep you off osteoporosis and help you slim down. Now I'm not condemning dairy products as I myself consume some dairy but here's a shocking piece of information a found out:

    Dairy and meat (animal protein) are amongst the most acidifying foods you can consume. When your body's Ph balance is altered by acidity your body's response is to balance it (alkalinize) and it does this with the help of calcium. Therefore, by consuming high amounts of animal-derived calcium-rich foods you are utilizing as much or more of the calcium you consume in fighting the acidity they bring about.

    That explains why this country has one of the highest rates of osteoporosis despite the high consumption of calcium-rich foods.

    It sounds confusing (I know) but it's like a vicious circle where you end up losing all the calcium you consume and then some more (from your reserve: your bones, which causes osteoporosis) on your pursuit of getting more calcium.

    Now I don't want to start the meat-eater vs. vegetarian controversy but I would say stick to plant sources of calcium and try to limit your intake of meat (especially red) and dairy so that you keep all the calcium you consume for the sake of your bones.
  • I'm confused. I keep hearing how milk and dairy are bad for you, that it may even cause most health problems, then I read a story like this. I was raised believing "Milk- It does a body good.' and have always been good at making sure we keep lowfat milk, cheese and yogurt in the house because I thought it was good for my bones and my kids' teeth.

    So what is fact and what is hype?

    I love milk, must have a glass at every meal and with my cereal. But I don't want osteoporosis. I do eat many other calcium and vitamin D rich foods... so am I covered?
  • I learned recently from "The Food Revolution" by John Robbins that dairy products are not a recommended for meeting calcium needs. The nations with the highest consumption of dairy products have the highest levels of osteoporosis. That is because calcium is not easily absorbed from milk. Kale and broccoli have a much higher calcium absorption rate than milk does.

    In addition, calcium needs to be absorbed with Vitamin D. Most Americans do not get nearly enough Vitamin D. I was surprised to find that I was not getting enough Vitamin D, even with a daily vitamin supplement. I now take Citracal twice a day to ensure that I have the maximum calcium absorption as Citracal includes high dosages of vitamin D.
    I resisted this at first, but I realized that Citracal made sense for me at this time.
  • I am 56 and have very good bone density (just got it tested this summer) but don't eat dairy products. I think eating a vegan diet with lots of fruits and especially vegetables is what has helped me keep strong bones. Staying away from calcium robbers such as soft drinks and coffee and other acidifying foods helps, too.

    Where do cows get their calcium from?
  • Our family doctor just told me this morning that we in the Pacific NW need extra Vitamin D. For the last 4 years, he's been telling patients to take 2,000 units per day. That's the highest tolerable dose, according to this article (which has lots of other great info as well): http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.
    asp I am an info-junkie, so I love this kind of detailed discussion. After reading this story I think I'll start using Vitamin D, especially in the winter months coming ...
  • Heading to the grocery for a fresh supply of prunes (aka dried plums!) and going to ask for a bone density test. I've lost 3 inches in height and am only 51 but carried too much weight around for too many years...Thanks for the comments here to go along w/the article.
  • Thanks for the great information. I have to work at it to get enough calcium daily.
  • Good and thoughtful article. Though I am not lactose intolerant, there are many who are, and the suggestions here would not do for them. I would hope there will be more out on what to do when you can't ingest dairy!

    My Mom was diagnosed with Osteoporosis in 1998. That year, I got my first bone density, and was floored to be diagnosed with Osteopenia. I was surprised being very heavy, and thought that would help my bones. NOT!

    I did not want to take any of the "bone" medicines, and chose to take Calcium instead.
    In 11 years I STILL have osteopenia... I have added to my regimen in that time. I added magnesium for one. Then 4 years ago I started on Osteovalin, a healthy bone nutrient that I take daily. I am sure that is a big factor in my maintaining without going into osteoporosis. Then 2 years ago, I added 1,000 mg. of Vitamin D every day....and now am up to 3,000 mg.

    My Father had osteoporosis too, so I work at this. The only thing I need to get serious about is strength training.

    Thanks again for this article.
  • JACQUELINENH: I'm really anxious to check out the site you recommended for those who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis and/or prescribed fosamax. I fall into both those categories. Thank you, in advance, for your post! SPARKY1955
  • This article--and the comments--are all helpful. It's nice to have options since I have problems with lactose, am allergic to oranges (no oj for me--ever--blech), and can't take a daily supplement (uti's every time within 3 days--even drinking lots of water). I'm worried about my bone density since I had a hysterectomy two years ago and so was forced into menopause.
  • Have you ever tried to avoid calcium - it's in everything! I take a medication that requires me to avoid calcium twice a day, and I literally have to take it on an empty stomach, because everything has calcium in it.....
  • I love Sally Field and how she has worked so hard to make women aware of osteoporosis. She said she didn't know anything about it until she was told she had it.
  • Hey! I've been eating dried plums myself (they don't want to be called prunes anymore - LOL)
    I've been looking and looking for someone on here who noticed that study - I'm impressed with your doctor - mine is all about taking medications. So far I'm not taking boniva ...
  • The article was OK as far as it went. I lost a lot of bone even with a high calcium diet and plenty of exercise.

    Last year my doctor recommended that I NOT increase my dairy intake, but rather take a Vitamin D supplement (1,000 mg daily) And it worked wonders on my lastbone density test. I had actually gained bone without medications - even at 54 years old and being menopausal now for 6 years.

    My last visit with him he recommended that I add prunes to my diet. 10 prunes a day he said would really do my bones well. (It has something to do with the minerals in the prunes) So now I'm trying the prunes out and I can't wait for my next bone density scan.

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