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How to Feed a Vegetarian

Meeting the Needs of Meatless Eaters
  -- By Stepfanie Romine, Staff Writer
It’s 6 o’clock. Your guests should be arriving in less than an hour. Then your friend calls. Guess who’s coming to dinner? Her new boyfriend, who's a vegetarian.

One night at the dinner table, your teenage daughter announces that she’s vegetarian and will no longer be eating meat, fish, dairy, or eggs.

Gulp.

That throws a wrench in your plans, doesn’t it? What do vegetarians eat? Is he going to start spouting off about animal rights as your husband carves the Christmas ham? Is she going to expect an entirely separate meal?

You can relax, even if you don’t know much about vegetarian cooking.  Have no fear. Cooking for a vegetarian is easy, and by the time you read our guide to feeding a vegetarian, you’ll be all set.

You probably have quite a few vegetarian meals in your repertoire and likely have at least a couple of vegetables and meatless foods on the menu or in the fridge.

As the name implies, vegetarians eat vegetables, but vegetarian cuisine is vast and exciting. With a few simple tips, any meal can accommodate a vegetarian, whether you have five minutes’ or a week’s notice.

First up, let’s figure out what “vegetarian” actually means. Some people call themselves “vegetarians” but eat fish or chicken, and others are much stricter about what they’ll eat. <pagebreak>

Glossary
Here is some helpful (and humorous) advice about feeding a vegetarian and anyone else with dietary restrictions. We’ve called upon experts, SparkPeople members, and personal experience to offer tips to help everyone break bread in peace.

How to Feed a Vegetarian: The Do’s and Don’ts
Beyond Broccoli: Tips on What to Cook

Consider a DIY meal. Put all the toppings or sides in separate dishes so everyone can accommodate their own lactose intolerance, aversion to spice, or vegan diet. How about a burrito bar? (Make some soy crumbles or sauté onions, peppers, and mushrooms for everyone.) What about a pasta buffet? (Serve pasta, sautéed vegetables, sausage or grilled chicken for the meat eaters, Alfredo and marinara sauces, and cheese, then let everyone build a bowl.) Or what about a pizza party? (Buy or make pizza dough, then let everyone make their own pizzas. Kids love this!)

Separate the meat and vegetables. Cook and serve meat in one dish, vegetables in another. If you had planned to roast yams with the ham, use two dishes. Making pasta? Cook sauce and set some aside before adding sausage or meat. Serve gravy on the side, and if you’re adding bacon to your baked potatoes, serve it separately. When grilling, clean part of the grill thoroughly or use foil to cook vegetables or veggie patties.

Use separate serving dishes, utensils and cutlery. That’s actually just a good kitchen tip in general: Never put cooked food on a plate or in a bowl that held raw meat, and use separate cutting boards and knives for vegetables, meat, and poultry. <pagebreak>
 
More Ideas for Those who Have a Vegetarian at Home

This has been a public serving announcement from your friendly neighborhood vegetarians, most of whom would never expect you to go out of your way to accommodate them. But your vegetarian friends and loved ones will appreciate your consideration, and chances are, you’ll become a more experienced (and healthful) host in the process.