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Health A-Z

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Harvard Medical School

Treatment

Infectious urethritis can be treated with a variety of antibiotics. Because certain strains of bacteria have become resistant to specific antibiotics, your doctor may need to prescribe a different antibiotic if symptoms continue after you have finished taking the first prescription.

All sex partners of a person infected with infectious urethritis also should be treated. People who are taking antibiotics for urethritis should not have sex until treatment is complete.

Because many people have gonorrhea and chlamydia at the same time, health experts recommend that all people treated for gonorrhea receive treatment for chlamydia as well. For this reason, you may need to take two types of antibiotics, because many commonly used antibiotics treat only one of the two infections.

No specific treatment is needed for urethritis caused by injury or chemical irritation. Your doctor may prescribe phenazopyridine (Pyridium) to ease any burning or pain with urination.

Urethritis associated with reactive arthritis is treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as naproxen.

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From Health A-Z, Harvard Health Publications. Copyright 2007 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. Written permission is required to reproduce, in any manner, in whole or in part, the material contained herein. To make a reprint request, contact Harvard Health Publications. Used with permission of StayWell.

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