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Sodium

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Watching sodium intake is just as important as watching fat, carbs etc.. Too much can play havock on the scale...especially right before a weigh in! Limit your pre-packaged foods, don't add salt to meals, and stay away from seafood before a weigh in. Of course....drink your H20 :)

- Submitted by SURREALDREAM 9/25/2010 in Weight Loss | 3 Comments
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Member Comments

DEEJACKSON 11/4/2010 2:28:00 PM

    I started tracking my sodium and was amazed at how much I consume on a daily basis, even though I NEVER add it to my food!
REEDSKI 9/30/2010 8:20:00 AM

    In the book The End of Overeating Dr. David A. Kessler explains that today food manufacturers add sodium, sugar, and fat to foods in certain combinations to make them hyper-palatable, causing us to CRAVE them which in turn causes us to come back for more and more and more. Avoiding or limiting processed foods is very important not just before weigh in but in general. This means supermarket food and restaurant food.

We do need some salt. You can track it on SparkPeople. I have a friend whose husband's blood tests showed he wasn't getting enough sodium.
KJS_MOM 9/28/2010 9:16:00 AM

    This might explain why I am having a hard time with the scale! I'm eating healthy but I think to much whole grain tortilla chips, even though it's made with sea salt, might be hurting me. Along with the salsa even though it's organic.

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