Is Being Really Lean Really Worth It?

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By: , – Molly Galbraith
8/1/2013 6:00 AM   :  126 comments   :  113,156 Views

Say what?!  Is being really lean really worth it?  This probably sounds like a crazy question coming from a trainer who helps clients reach their fat-loss and physique goals.
 
Before we get started, let me say that I realize this is a very ambiguous question.  ''Really lean'' is relative, and I will tell you up front that I don’t have an answer for you. Only you have that answer for you. This blog post is simply intended to help you realize a few things:

1.    Everybody is different.
2.    Some of us can maintain leaner physiques than others.
3.    Going beyond a healthy level of leanness for YOU is a stressor.
4.    It’s not normal, and it may not even be healthy, to walk around shredded all the time.
5.    How lean do you want to be, and will you sacrifice what it takes to get there?
 
Let’s explore each of these.

1.    Everybody is different.
I have a saying: ''If you want longer, leaner muscles, get different parents.'' We were all given a unique genetic code that affects how our bodies look.  I will never be petite, or skinny, or naturally tan.  (I tried to fight this simple fact for many years, and I almost destroyed my skin in the process.)
 
Ouch. It hurts me just to look at this.

There are things we can do to make the best of our genetics, of course, but at the end of the day, we are the product of our parents. (Darn you Dad, and your Scotch-Irish heritage!) The sooner you accept this, the more you can focus on making the most of what you’ve been given, as opposed to trying to change things that won’t change.
 
2. Some of us can maintain leaner physiques than others. 
We all know that person who eats whatever they want, doesn't exercise, and still has an absolutely gorgeous and lean physique.  (It’s even more annoying when they have natural muscle tone too, right?  I mean…how is that even fair?!?) We also all know the person who is very strict with their diet, exercises religiously, gets enough sleep, and takes great care of themselves, yet they struggle with carrying more body fat than they’d like.
 
Remember, we all have a genetic predisposition to look a certain way.  If you come from a very lean family, chances are, you can maintain a leaner physique than someone who comes from a heavier family.  (I am not ignoring the environmental factors that come into play here in terms of the foods you were/weren’t given as a child, and the activity levels encouraged by leaner families vs. heavier families, because I know that plays a role. Just trying to keep things simple.)

I have a few friends who walk around quite lean on a regular basis with no problems.  They eat well and exercise hard, but they feel really good and have a ton of energy when they are really lean. My friend Siouxsie (below) consistently rocks a lean physique and feels good while doing it.

 
Photo Credit: Siouxsie Gisselberg
 
I, on the other hand, am foggy-brained, cold, and lose my period when I am really lean.  The last six weeks before my first figure competition, I felt like each of my limbs weighed 300 pounds!  It was miserable.

 
No wonder I look angry here. I felt like garbage!

This is frustrating, but I have come to terms with it.  I am learning to be comfortable with the level of leanness where my health, performance, aesthetics, and lifestyle intersect.
 
3. Going beyond a healthy level of leanness for YOU is a stressor.
Above, I mentioned that when I’ve gotten very lean in the past, I experienced fatigue, heavy limbs, foggy-headedness, and I lost my period.  Those symptoms don’t generally happen when your body is healthy and functioning well, right?
 
In some instances, it’s just your body adjusting to its new ''set point,'' but not always.
Your ''set point'' is the body weight or body fat level to which your body has become accustomed.  It may or may not be a healthy weight or body fat level, but if you have been there for a while, your body often fights to keep you there. Once you have maintained a new ''set point'' for a reasonable amount of time (6-12 months), it becomes easier to stay there.
 
Just ask anyone who has lost or gained a significant amount of weight in a short period of time. Until they have maintained their new weight for a while, it’s a struggle to stay there. The body likes to maintain homeostasis because it’s safe. Hormone levels, blood pH, heart rate, blood pressure…all of these things are tightly controlled, and if they go too far in one direction or the other, we are in danger. Your body generally doesn’t like large weight fluctuations, either. If you try to get leaner than where your body is comfortable, it will fight back. We have a saying at my gym: ''If you don’t slow down, your body will slow you down.'' That’s what your body is doing if you are trying to get leaner and you start experiencing symptoms similar to what I listed.
 
4. It’s not normal, and it may not even be healthy to walk around shredded all the time.
My good friend Jen Comas Keck touched on this in her article, ''Looking Fit Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Being Healthy.'' If it were ''normal'' to walk around super lean all of the time, more people would be really lean. That’s kind of common sense, right? Not to beat a dead horse, but if you aren’t someone who runs lean naturally, trying to maintain extreme levels of leanness is not healthy.

It’s frustrating, because as I discussed in this article, with the surge in social media over the last several years, we have become bombarded with images of our favorite fitness professionals (each of us looking our very best, no doubt), but even worse are the ''fitspo'' (short for "fitness inspiration") posters. These are images of extremely lean women with motivational sayings like, ''Winners never take a day off!'' or, ''Train insane or remain the same.''
 

I’m sorry, what?  Never take a day off?  Train insane?  Umm, how about the importance of recovery?  How about intelligent training? (You can read more about the ''fitspo'' posters here.)These images give us a false sense of normalcy, and cause many of us to feel dissatisfied with our bodies because we are chasing unhealthy and unrealistic goals.
 
5. How lean do you want to be, and will you sacrifice what it takes to get there? 
I realize that these are some very tricky questions I am posing. It’s hard to know how lean we want to get, because when we achieve that level of leanness, oftentimes it’s not enough. It’s the same with strength training. I thought that when I achieved a 135-pound bench, a 225-pound squat, and a 315-pound deadlift, I would be satisfied. Pfffft. Yeah, right. I’ve smoked each of those numbers and I am not even close to satisfied. Leanness can be the same way.
 
At one point, I thought this would satisfy me. I was dead wrong.

You don’t necessarily have to have a solid answer for these questions, but it is something to think about. As an example, there is a young woman who trains at my gym and she was a D1 college soccer player. She is naturally slim, athletic, and lean, but she had mentioned wanting to lose some fat in her lower body. Her diet is great, her training is great, and she takes good care of herself. All that being said, she does enjoy the occasional cupcake, beer, or glass of wine (or two).
 
We were discussing what it would take for her to get leaner, and after she told me about her diet and lifestyle, I saw no major red flags. I came to the conclusion that if she wanted to get leaner, she would need to get significantly stricter with her eating, or make other lifestyle sacrifices, so I asked if she was willing to do that. Was she willing to get a LOT more strict to possibly see some SMALL changes in her physique? Her answer was no. And THAT IS OK.
 
Know thyself, my friends. If you don’t want to make sacrifices (big or small) to change your body, then that is your prerogative. This woman has found the spot where her aesthetics, performance, health, and lifestyle intersect. Maybe none of them are exactly where she wants them to be, but she has found a solid balance. If you would prefer to be extremely lean, and it’s worth it to you to skip social events, get in bed by 9 p.m. every night, and train twice a day to get there, that’s fantastic. Do it. You are choosing aesthetics over lifestyle, and probably over performance and health, but if you want it, then do it.

Figure out what you want. Figure out what it takes to get there, and then decide if it makes sense for your life. Is being lean really worth it?  I don’t know…you tell me.

What do you think? Can you relate to the desire to lose more weight even when it takes a significant toll on your lifestyle or how you feel? Would it be worth it to you to be "really lean"?

About the Author
Molly Galbraith is a rapidly rising young trainer who is quickly making a name for herself in the fitness industry.  She is a strength coach and co-owner of J&M Strength and Conditioning, a rapidly expanding, private gym in Lexington, Kentucky for professional athletes and the general public alike.

Molly is also co-founder of the wildly popular Girls Gone Strong group, a movement dedicated to changing the way women train. She has also been an expert contributor to magazines like Oxygen and Experience Life

No stranger to the gym herself, she has competed in both figure and powerlifting and her best lifts include a 275-lb. squat, a 165-lb. bench press, and a 341-lb. deadlift. 

Her mission is to, ''Help women give themselves grace and compassion when it comes to their bodies, and to help them discover and accept what their best body looks like, with minimal time and effort.''

You can find out more about Molly by visiting her website, and you can keep up with her latest adventures on Facebook and Twitter


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Comments

  • 126
    I know what my acceptable level of sacrifice is and I can tell you, it won't get me to that point but that's OK. I am doing well with a moderate workout routine, healthful dietary changes and progressive weight loss. I will ultimately get to the point where I'm in "normal" sizes, my weight and fitness levels no longer pose a health hazard, and I can enjoy a vibrant and active life. I don't need or want to be a fitness model (nor will I!) so my goal is just to be healthy and normal. That's just me though, and if there's one thing I've definitely learned it's NOT to judge. - 12/15/2014   11:53:07 AM
  • 125
    Yes, it takes a huge amount of effort to achieve excellence. If it were easy, fun or fast, everyone would be at that level, who are we kidding? There's no reason to throw the process under the bus - to each his own! - 11/2/2014   9:57:30 AM
  • 124
    I just spent some significant time on her site, she hits her points and backs them up. Well done Molly, proving even us guys can get it though our thick heads once in a while. - 8/17/2014   6:10:45 PM
  • 123
    Wow! A SP blog I really liked! Great advice. Please post more like this! - 6/30/2014   12:59:16 PM
  • 122
    I totally love this article. To hear such kind & compassionate words towards people, mainly women, from a trainer is a nice change!!! You can tell Molly cares for women and how they view themselves...not just saying "you need to stop eating crap and workout every day at top speed". Sooo unrealistic. More people thinking like this will make more people be HAPPY with who THEY are. - 6/30/2014   12:50:48 PM
  • 121
    This article is very thought provoking. I had a goal number in mind but have since changed it to a much more reasonable goal. This is in part to watching a co-worker(my inspiration) get very lean (she is my age - 50) and she looks like she aged 10 years. She works out everyday and eats really boring food. No Thank you! To a foodie like me that just isnt going to happen! I just want to be fit and healthy. - 6/30/2014   11:22:14 AM
  • 120
    I liked this article, its a nice reminder to put things in perspective. - 6/30/2014   7:37:37 AM
  • 119
    SUCH an important conversation for us to be having - thank you! - 6/25/2014   6:28:51 AM
  • 118
    Thanks very much for this. It's exactly where I am right now. I'm trying to decide if I need to push for the last 5 lbs. toward the goal I set 2 years ago when I started this journey, or if listening to my body how it is today is REALLY OK and possibly changing that "all important" goal #.

    I was thinking this morning if I would be really satisfied with 5 more lbs. or if I would push for more once I lost those. Focusing on that goal number has made it hard to feel proud of me cuz "I'm not there yet". Sad yes.

    After reading this, I think I might have the courage to change my goal and tell myself "You are good enough right now!"

    Thanks for the reality check!! - 4/28/2014   2:22:00 PM
  • 117
    *A picture is worth a thousand words.* Six of the seven photos associated with this article illustrate "really-lean", and the last is bust-up. From a visual standpoint, this article says "Is it worth it? Here are a bunch of pics of a shredded trainer!" How about six more photos of you from what you consider a more realistic viewpoint? - 4/17/2014   4:50:10 PM
  • CRDUFFIELD
    116
    This is a much-needed perspective as we're bombarded with these fitness ideals all over social media, tv, etc.

    I'm 5'8" and when I started running 10-12 miles per week and weight lifting, I saw that I could get crazy lean, so I started eating super clean too. Bottom line, I got below 110 lbs and even though I was healthy and training properly, I looked scary thin and people were concerned. I'm back up to 115 and trying to gain a few pounds so we can get pregnant. Even though I could be leaner, I've learned I'm happier not stressing over a slice of pizza on Saturday nights, skipping a gym session to teach a Bible study, etc. I could be leaner, but I'd rather be balanced! - 4/17/2014   3:24:32 PM
  • 115
    I don't know. I want to look lean and fit, for the effort I put in at the gym and my level of fitness. I don't necessarily need to be "cut". I lost a lot of weight and unfortunately, the saggy skin didn't go away and it didn't tighten up. I've started working on the "how much am I willing to sacrifice via food intake" again.... - 2/12/2014   4:44:31 PM
  • 114
    I will say that it is worth it and important to me to get down to the best weight for my age, height and body type. That may not look "lean" to some people, but I remember feeling really good when was around 145 lbs and feeling awkward when I got down to 135 lbs. That was likely because I had never been that weight, hadn't seen myself much and had always walked around with more weight, so even looking at myself and moving around on less weight felt awkward. All the fitness calculators keep telling me that the healthiest weight and BMI will put me around 125 lbs. Sorry, not going there. I don't think my body is made for that and I won't stress about it. If I can get down to about 140 lbs (I'm about 194 now), I think that will be a great compromise. We'll see what happens, but I also want to give myself time at certain weights to allow my body to fully adjust so that I don't stress myself. It could be that I'd feel fantastic at 125 lbs, but I'd just like to focus on 140 first to get back to my comfort zone. Then we'll see how I feel about going further from there... - 11/17/2013   6:35:53 PM
  • 113
    Perfectly written and yes, i had to sit down with myself ask why I am losing weight. The answer is: health and vitality. I can never be thick and curvy and I don't want six pack abs. I want the ability to run for miles and look normal. - 9/26/2013   12:43:21 PM
  • 112
    Perfectly written and yes, i had to sit down with myself ask why I am losing weight. The answer is: health and vitality. I can never be thick and curvy and I don't want six pack abs. I want the ability to run for miles and look normal. - 9/26/2013   12:43:14 PM
  • 111
    I'm not willing to sacrifice enough to weigh a BMI of 18.5. However, I was not happy at BMI 25 even though my doctor was. After 5 decades of being obese, I love weighing what I wanted to weigh in junior high, around 126, a BMI of 20.5. - 9/14/2013   4:33:59 PM
  • 110
    Great post, thank you for sharing. Very interesting :) - 8/30/2013   3:33:44 PM
  • SHAWNJONES69
    109
    This article was great. For some reason I used to think that just because someone was thin or lean, that they were automatically healthy. I'm not where I want to be in terms of weight and body tone, but I know I'm not the most unhealthy person just because I have a few extra pounds. I do workout more now, so I will be more comfortable in my skin as time goes on. - 8/22/2013   8:40:37 AM
  • PAMPEEKEMD
    108
    I am frustrated by the fitspo images as well and it's a real struggle to find pictures of people of either normal or overweight who are working out to use in social media. Strength, energy and health are the ultimate goals of what we eat and how [much] we exercise. I'm glad that you discuss this.

    I would like to add one caveat to your very good post: really lean fits a minority of the genetic jackpot. Really lean becomes harder and harder to maintain as you grow older. Really lean changes when a woman has children. Even the really lean now might have to struggle in not-that-distant future.

    I'm not just talking about gaining some weight because of not being able to work out a couple of hours a day. A really lean woman will find that age, pregnancy, hormones can shift her body composition around without gaining much weight at all.

    I want my patients and readers to be comfortable with a fit, energetic and healthy body irregardless of washboard abs or thighs that don't touch. I also want my very overweight and obese patients and readers not to dream about the bodies in the fit inspiration posters. They will earn terrific, beautiful bodies with their lifestyle changes -- they may even kick some very lean women's butts in a race or lifting weights. But these images are poisonous to everyone at a certain point in their lives. - 8/20/2013   5:38:38 PM
  • 107
    ''If you want longer, leaner muscles, get different parents.''

    True. The following is also true -
    ''If you want longer, leaner muscles, get younger.''

    Hit age 40 or so (and older) and it's not likely that you will be ... there. But you can look and feel better. I think that's worth striving for. - 8/8/2013   5:00:03 PM
  • 106
    This article and "Want the Body of a Fitness Model? Find Out What It Really Takes" (linked under related entries) by Coach Nicole have been indispensable in exploring the value of leanness, what it takes to get there, and ultimately, is it worth it? The disconnect between a healthy lifestyle and what it would take to get the body of a fitness model is huge! Thanks for injecting some reality into the pursuit of the perfect body! - 8/8/2013   6:30:56 AM
  • 105
    Many ideas presented here I hadn't considered before - and I am an avid reader of both fitness and nutrition articles. I've been asking myself how it is that I lost 30+ pounds, have kept them off for two years, but now can't seem to get the next 10-15 pounds off that would finally get rid of the below waist fat. Did I really never have a cookie or a bowl of ice cream while getting to 145? I eat well and healthy and clean - most of the time, what indeed would it take to get me to 130 or 135? As a mother of a large family, I've often said I'm not willing to be hungry (or cold, or mean!!) - not fair to myself or the people around me! It's so hard to get it into my head that My Best Look can only come from me, it cannot come from the image of someone else's body.
    Thank you for a real thought provoking and illuminating article. - 8/8/2013   12:07:52 AM
  • 104
    Molly, thank you for this article. I myself have pushed way too hard in the past just to look "fit". - 8/7/2013   1:32:49 PM
  • BATTLEHARDEN
    103
    Just what I needed. While I do have some lifestyle changes to make for a healthier leaner body type.... perhaps I do not have as many as I thought. I have maintained my 30 pound weight loss for 12 months so hopefully I have a new set point and with this article perhaps I have reset my mental attitude too! - 8/7/2013   12:14:01 PM
  • 102
    Molly, thank you! What a great informative article! I appreciate it when knowledgable people lay it out there for all of us to learn, but even more when they use themselves as an example of what not to do and what they've learned is right to do. I have struggled with my weight since puberty. I had stretch marks on my thighs by the time I was 10 years old. I have come to grips with the fact that the only way I'm going to be happy with what's on the outside is to get to a point I know I've done everything I can to "get right". I have weakness on occasion, but I work hard to fight it everyday. Thanks for the inspiration! - 8/7/2013   10:14:38 AM
  • MUNCHKIN_71
    101
    This was a very interesting article. I enjoyed reading it, and it gives me hope at the end of my tunnel. I have always battled my weight my entire life. Now when I get to my ideal weight and maintain it, it will get easier for me. You don't have to deprive yourself to be lean, I don't and I have already lost 59 pounds. It may be taking a little longer than if I did deprive myself, but I won't do that. I will reach my ideal image, which I don't get from the models or anyone else, I get from myself. I know where I am supposed to be and I will get there and stay there. - 8/6/2013   11:18:14 PM
  • 100
    I really didn't read the whole article but I personally still think it would be great to be the same weight I was when I was 20. having said that I knew a guy from karate years ago that said he was really skinny in high school by eating only an apple a day (supposedly) and he ended up going to emergency from malnutrition. - 8/6/2013   8:28:36 PM
  • 3BOYZOO
    99
    Molly - thank you for this thought provoking article. Most of the what you said "should" be common sense, but we all need reminders of what is healthy. I am 46, 5'9" and weigh 140 lbs. I love to work out but I also love to eat. I have recently read that most fitness models can only hold their "perfect shape" for a couple hours - 1 day at the most which is just enough time for their photo shoot. I wish EVERYONE would realize this and understand that they do not walk around ripped and lean 24/7/365. I'm not willing to sacrifice my sanity to look like that. So I continue to fight the good and healthy fight and learn to love my body. - 8/6/2013   4:57:17 PM
  • TRACEYBEEME
    98
    Great balanced article, I guess with everything in life we can over do it. Accepting where you are is great for mental health. Thank you. - 8/6/2013   3:18:46 PM
  • FMREYNA1
    97
    I am definitely over weight but I know that after having two kids and almost 40 I wont be high school thin again. Id be happy with a size 8 or 10 no matter what the numbers say. I am purchasing a total body weight machine for our whole family to use. hopefully I can lose some of this excess and tone things up to look thinner than I am. weight is definitely an issue since I am insulin resistant I can put it on just looking at food but taking it off is so much harder. - 8/6/2013   3:07:49 PM
  • IMAWAGOH
    96
    Dear Molly,

    Thanks for this well-written slice of inspiration. At the moment, I'm heavier than I want to be, but not discouraged. I'm working my way back to MY healthy weight. Okay, now Molly, I keep looking at the picture in which you felt like "garbage." Please forgive me girl, cause I just can't muster any sympathy-lol. Keep up the good work! - 8/6/2013   2:07:22 PM
  • 95
    Great, balanced article. Thanks very much, Molly. - 8/6/2013   2:02:38 PM
  • 94
    Very well written! I also have "leaned out" for different events. Here is what I learned: Because I carry so much junk in my trunk, I have to get well below 10% body fat to get a "balanced" lean look. I am clumsy, irritable, hungry (dry wall looks appealing), prone to injury, and (scariest of all) my long-range vision becomes very foggy. It may look good, but I am far from healthy. Not worth it.

    I'd rather live longer and healthier with a less-than balanced physique than live a shorter life looking like a fitness model. - 8/6/2013   12:21:15 PM
  • NJMSTAR
    93
    Another thing we need to remember is most of those lean ripped bodies are making their living in the fitness business. They get paid to work out and don't have to find time before or after work to do it. As an empty nester I now have the time get the muscle definition I've always wanted, but with my aging skin getting lean enough to see my muscles would actually make me look way old. Unfortunately exercise and diet can't do much for sagging wrinkled crepey skin. Need to keep a layer of fat to keep it plumped out. - 8/6/2013   12:07:46 PM
  • CANUCKSFAN2
    92
    I am a size 20 and not obese or overweight. - 8/6/2013   12:02:13 PM
  • 91
    Thank you, thank you, and thank you! I've just successfully lost 42 lbs over a 10-month period, and I have become confused as to how I would know I was done (what's a goal weight, anyway???). This article is so helpful and validating! - 8/6/2013   11:52:05 AM
  • DELLMEL
    90
    Great article. Keep pushing toward your goal. You looking good girl. - 8/6/2013   10:40:28 AM
  • 89
    Very, very good article, and something that I have come to terms with. I would like to comment to PELLE003 who is going through early menopause. I am about 10 years older than you and just went through menopause, and the same thing happened to me. I am 20 lbs heavier than I ever was before, even after having four kids. It's not all that bad! Yes, I am carrying fat on my body now...but that is ok. I have a figure and a husband who is loving it, and I get to be a good example for my children by showing them it's ok to be less than "perfect" as is judged and admired by society as a whole. I am still fit and healthy, and I no longer freeze my butt off every Maine winter, so I actually get to enjoy the outdoors more! - 8/6/2013   9:53:01 AM
  • CHRISTASP
    88
    Very very well said. - 8/6/2013   9:50:28 AM
  • 87
    Awesome article, thanks so much for this. :) - 8/6/2013   9:14:24 AM
  • PELLE003
    86
    Thank you for such a thoughtful article. It seemed to be there just for me this morning as these are the exact struggles that have been weighing heavy on me. I'm 43 and a few years ago diagnosed with primary ovarian failure which brought on early menopause. I was one that was always slim, weighed the same for 20 years. I could eat, drink and reasonably exercise and stay the same. The last few years with the changing hormones I've put on 20 pounds that won't budge. I do watch what I eat and increased exercise to almost daily and nothing. Mr Dr. said I would even have to be more restrictive in my diet and increase exercise more and that this is common for menopause. My struggle has been at what point do I say "enough". Be healthy. I will most likely never be down to my old weight and that should be ok. How much is too much "sacrifice"? - 8/6/2013   9:10:59 AM
  • 85
    Nice article, never thought about it this way before. Thanks! - 8/6/2013   8:47:34 AM
  • CIRANDELLA
    84
    I figure that as long as they meet their primary care doctor's approval, they're free to do what they want. I'm at the lower end of my weight range and I lost 70+ pounds to get there...but my doctor's very pleased, and so's my arthritis. I'm 61. - 8/6/2013   8:06:20 AM
  • 83
    This article really spoke to me. I am 5'8" and 61 years old and upset that I weigh 158 when last year I was 153. I spent over $2,000 in the last two years with a metabolic weight loss center and lost 23 pounds getting down to 145 which I thought was my goal weight. Guess what? I was weak and cranky and could not socialize with my friends because alcohol and almost anything that was on the menu was off my list of acceptable food. I remember drinking water and sitting with my friends while they were eating blue cheese lettuce wedges with bacon and drinking wine and I actually felt angry at them! In 2013 I decided to relax my craziness about food (as one person above said I was becoming VERY boring) and just enjoy my life and my friends and accept that my body is changing after menopause at 57 . I also adopted a "mindful eating" philosophy and am careful with what I intake- carbs especially and sugar which I crave and is poison to my body- makes me bloat and crave more and more. I also upped my cardio going to Jazzercise 4 times a week and walking my new dog a couple times a day. I also got a FITBIT tracker which tells me how many steps and miles and calories I have done every day. I also have decided to love my belly which is where my three babies came from (now grown men) and have totally redone my wardrobe to cover my belly and focus on my legs which look surprisingly good for my age thanks to Jazzercise and walking. I drink my beer every day but try to stick to low carb and when I feel I have overindulged in food or drink I have a lean day which means only an egg and tea for breakfast and a shake with plant protein (Vega), frozen berries, almond milk and flax seeds. Then I might go out for dinner with friends and have fish and salad and beer ! - 8/6/2013   8:02:08 AM
  • 82
    I haven't been "lean" since my second child. I don't work for it hard enough. - 8/6/2013   7:39:25 AM
  • MOLLYCLARA
    81
    Fantastic article!! Like alot of women, esp older--50"s I struggle to lose weight as I age. Two years ago was 20 lbs lighter due to illness--liked the smaller clothes size but I looked and felt terrible. Now am healthy, eating and sleeping well, work out regularly but would need to severely restrict my calories to lose weight. I am not willing to sacrifice that much and have accepted that I am healthy, happy and OK the way I am. Keep writing such inspirational and true articles!! - 8/6/2013   7:20:56 AM
  • 80
    Every gym I've been to has at least one anorexic girl running on a treadmill for hours on end. Why doesn't someone talk some reason into her? If they did, she might move to another, more "tolerant" gym, that's why, and they value their bottom line more than the health of their members. - 8/6/2013   7:07:42 AM
  • MAUIFRAN
    79
    I am starting all over again and gained alot of weight back but now I know that healthy is better and that I will see the numbers fall but I will never be 102 again!
    Will not stress on it either!!!!!!! Wish me luck! - 8/6/2013   2:24:17 AM
  • 78
    Wonderful Article!! I was at my "goal weight" and thought I was very healthy. Then my periods stopped, I was cold all the time, and my body revolted. I gained 30 pounds in 8 weeks and developed hypothyroidism. - 8/3/2013   4:38:26 PM
  • GRACILU
    77
    Fantastic article. It has me take a step back to evaluate my decision making about my health. Keep up the good work. - 8/3/2013   2:50:28 PM

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