New FDA Nutrition Labels Would Be Easier to Read

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By: , SparkPeople Blogger
3/1/2014 12:00 AM   :  9 comments   :  10,054 Views

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A round-up of the most interesting and thought-provoking stories of the week.

Child obesity rates drop 43% in past decade USA Today
Good news: Far fewer kids ages two to five are obese today compared with eight years ago. Bad news: Experts warn the numbers might be misleading.

New F.D.A. Nutrition Labels Would Make ‘Serving Sizes’ Reflect Actual Servings NYT
Confused by nutrition labels? You're not alone. Thankfully, new regulations, which will include larger type for calorie counts and easier-to-understand serving sizes, could be coming soon.

Maybe That BPA In Your Canned Food Isn't So Bad After All NPR
Remember how eliminating BPA from the linings of canned foods was a hot topic just a couple of years ago? Now, some experts say it's not such a big deal after all. Do you agree?

The Cast of Gym Characters Fit Bottomed Girls
We giggled at this roundup of the interesting characters at FBG Erin's gym. Do you people watch at the gym?  

Which stories topped your "must-read" list this week?
 


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Comments

  • FOXGLOVE999
    9
    Changing the serving size on the package is going to make comparisons more difficult. If I pick up a single size bag and it's 4 ounces, but labeled as 1 serving, the calorie count is obviously going to be higher than a large bag with a serving size of 1 ounce. That's doesn't necessarily mean that the single size bag is less healthy, just badly labeled. Consistency in serving size is necessary for comparisons, if you make this more difficult people will give up. - 9/30/2014   9:54:06 AM
  • 8
    Now if they would just be forced to label GMO ingredients... - 3/10/2014   9:20:25 PM
  • 7
    YAY!!! Potassium count is coming! Thanks FDA for listening to my posts! - 3/6/2014   9:36:26 AM
  • 6
    If you buy a bag of chips or a can of pop, the calories listed should be for the entire single serving product you are buying - no 1/2 a bag/can etc. Really deceiving - 3/6/2014   7:39:01 AM
  • 5
    I may be the only one who takes this stand, but I think upping the serving sizes on labels is absurd. Instead of encouraging people to eat "healthy" servings of unhealthy foods, which indeed is half a cup of ice cream or 8 ounces of soda, we are now going to placate people so they can claim, "It's okay to eat this whole bowl of ice cream in a single sitting because it's only 1 serving. It even says so on the label."

    This is like raising the legally acceptable blood alcohol content for DUIs, just because drunk drivers generally drink more than what's acceptably legal.

    Our children and their children are going to adopt these new serving sizes as the standard and therefore, acceptable, which they are not. We're taking a huge step backwards, I think. - 3/5/2014   3:04:05 PM
  • 4
    Vital changes, particularly in individual packaging as one serving...also hope Vit A and C get left on label. - 3/5/2014   12:36:39 PM
  • 3
    I really like the new labels. I think the added sugars line is great, but I'm wondering where companies are going to find loop holes. Hopefully they won't! - 3/5/2014   7:59:42 AM
  • 2
    I am really looking forward to seeing the added sugars line on nutrition labels. I am shocked but I really like how the new labels look. I heard on NPR something about colors (red, yellow, green) but maybe that was a interviewee's added suggestion. - 3/1/2014   1:51:12 AM
  • 1
    “The changes put added sugars clearly in the cross hairs,” said Dr. David A. Kessler, who was commissioner during the original push for labels in the 1990s. “America has the sweetest diet in the world. You can’t get to be as big as we’ve gotten without added sweeteners.”

    Sorry Dr Kessler. You clearly have never been across the Atlantic. Ireland and England have much sweeter teeth than the US. But. It is a good thing to tell consumers where their sugar is coming from. - 3/1/2014   12:48:49 AM

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